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Street food has become so popular over the last decade in the UK, but there are still many regions of street food still to be explored by UK diners, here is recipe from South Africa!

Bunny chow is simply a hollow bread roll stuffed with curry – not made with real bunny, but with tender pieces of stewed lamb. In its native South Africa it is often spooned into large hollowed-out loaves of bread, which are designed to be eaten with your hands – quite a challenge, even for the most dextrous! For ease of eating I prefer to use smaller rolls, so really hungry diners may want more than one.

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SERVES 4–8, ALLOWING 1–2 EACH, DEPENDING ON GREED

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

700g lamb leg steaks, cut into 3cm cubes

2 onions, roughly chopped

3 garlic cloves, chopped

4cm piece fresh root ginger, chopped

1 tablespoon cumin seeds

2 teaspoons fennel seeds

1–2 teaspoons dried chilli flakes, to taste

1 cinnamon stick

4 vine tomatoes, chopped

2 tablespoons garam masala

550–600g (around 2 large)

potatoes, peeled and cut into 3cm cubes

8 large crusty white bread rolls

salt and freshly ground black pepper

a small bunch of coriander, chopped, to garnish

1 small red onion, thinly sliced, to garnish

Spices for the recipe go to store.eastendfoods.co.uk/

Place the vegetable oil in a large, heavy-based pan and set over a high heat. When it’s hot, brown the lamb in 2 or 3 batches, transferring to a plate as you go. Set aside.

Add the onion, garlic and ginger to a food processor and whizz to a smooth paste, adding a tablespoon or two of cold water to help it along, if necessary.

Lower the heat on the empty pan and add the cumin, fennel, chilli flakes and cinnamon stick, frying for a few seconds until you can smell their aroma wafting up from the pan. Stir through the onion paste and fry for 10 minutes until starting to soften. Return all the meat and any juices to the pan, along with the tomatoes and garam masala. Season with salt and pepper, pour in 500ml water and bring to the boil. Cover with a lid, reduce the heat to low and simmer gently for about an hour, until the meat is nearly tender. Add the potatoes, re-cover and simmer for another 30 minutes or so until the potatoes are cooked.

While the curry is simmering, slice the tops off the bread rolls and scoop out the insides to leave a shell about 1cm thick all round. Reserve the insides for dunking in the curry.

When the curry has finished cooking, divide evenly between the hollow rolls. Garnish with a little coriander and a few onion slices and eat immediately – cutlery optional!

Credit: MasterChef: Street Food of the World by Genevieve Taylor with recipes from previous MasterChef winners worldwide (Absolute Press, £26)

Photography © David Loftus

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Further recipes and interview in Chaat! issue 28

NEHARI

LAMB NEHARI

Regarded as the national dish of Pakistan, nehari is known for its piquancy

and texture. The name has its origins in Arabic and means ‘day’ or ‘morning’

and it was typically served to kings and nobility around sunrise, after the

Muslim early morning Fajr prayer. The Mughals brought it to the Indian

subcontinent and it soon became a nationwide tradition among the Muslims.

The dish comprises slow-cooked large, tender shanks or pieces of beef,

mutton or lamb and, while not completely authentic, even chicken. Known

for its spiciness, it is a delicious curry with a thick, flavoursome sauce that is

often sold with naan fresh from the tandoor in specialist restaurants and

roadside cafes early in the morning, particularly on weekends.

 

SERVES 4

2 medium onions, peeled and halved

120ml/4fl oz/1⁄2 cup vegetable oil

2 bay leaves

900g/2lb leg of lamb on the bone, cut into 7.5–10cm/3–4in cubes, or 3–4 medium lamb shanks

15ml/1 tbsp garam masala

15ml/1 tbsp ground coriander

10ml/2 tsp garlic pulp

10ml/2 tsp ginger pulp

5ml/1 tsp freshly grated nutmeg

10ml/2 tsp ground fennel seeds

10ml/2 tsp paprika

30ml/2 tbsp tomato paste

7.5ml/11⁄2 tsp salt

1 litre/13⁄4 pints/4 cups water, plus 60ml/4 tbsp to make a flour paste

30ml/2 tbsp plain (all-purpose) flour

15ml/1 tbsp chopped fresh coriander (cilantro)

2 lemons, cut into wedges, to serve

naan or parathas, to serve

TO GARNISH

4–6 fresh green chillies, chopped

45ml/3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander (cilantro)

45ml/3 tbsp peeled and finely sliced fresh root ginger

 

1 Process the onions in a food processor to form a pulp.

2 Heat 60ml/4 tbsp of the oil in a very large pan over a medium heat and fry the

bay leaves for about 30 seconds. Add the meat, followed by the garam masala.

Fry for about 5 minutes, to seal the meat.

3 Add the ground coriander, garlic, ginger, nutmeg, ground fennel seeds,

paprika and tomato paste and stir to combine. Add the salt and stir once more,

then remove from the heat.

4 In a separate pan, heat the remaining oil over a medium heat, add the pulped

onion and fry for about 10 minutes, until golden brown.

5 Add the onion pulp to the lamb and combine everything together. Pour in the

water, return to the heat and bring to the boil.

6 Reduce the heat to low and cook for 45–60 minutes, checking occasionally and

stirring. The curry is ready once the liquid has reduced by at least half and the

meat is tender and falling off the bone.

7 Dissolve the flour in the 60ml/4 tbsp water, whisking it well to make a smooth

paste. Pour this over the lamb while slowly and gently stirring the curry. Cook for

a further 7–10 minutes, stirring frequently, until the sauce is thick.

8 Using a ladle, transfer the curry to a serving dish, or individual deep plates if

using shanks – allowing one per person. Serve garnished with chillies, fresh

coriander, and ginger, and accompany with lemon wedges, and naan or parathas.

The Food and Cooking of Pakistan: Traditional Dishes From The Home Kitchen by Shehzad Husain (HB, Lorenz Books, Dec-16, £14.99) is available now on Amazon.co.uk

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