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A quick and easy dish, yet impressive.

You can be really imaginative with flavourings and try whatever is in season to flavour it.

Serves: 4

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Cooking time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

6 large British Lion eggs

1 red onion, finely chopped

2 green chillies, seeded and finely chopped

½ tsp roasted cumin seeds, coarsely crushed

½ tsp turmeric

1 tbsp chives, finely chopped

1 tsp green coriander, finely chopped

1 ½ tsp salt

½ inch piece of ginger, finely chopped

2 tbsp oil

Chaat! Magazine Sponsor Product Suggestion East End Foods Range – Ground Cumin www.store.eastendfoods.co.uk

For the sauce

3 tbsp oil

1 bay leaf

2 green cardamoms

1 large onion, finely chopped

1 tbsp ginger and garlic paste

1 tsp red chilli powder

½ tsp ground cumin

½ tsp ground coriander

½ tsp ground turmeric

1 tsp salt

3 tomatoes, pureed

½ tsp sugar

½ tsp ground garam masala

1tbsp green coriander, chopped

1 tbsp single cream

Juice from ½ lemon

 

 

Method

  1. Break the eggs and whisk together with all the other ingredients except the oil.

 

  1. Take a large shallow non-stick frying pan and heat the oil, pour in just enough egg mixture to make a thin omelette and as it begins to set, remove from pan and roll into a cylinder similar to a Swiss roll. Repeat the procedure to use all of the egg mixture. Cut the omelette rolls in 1.5 cm thick slices and keep warm.

 

  1. Sauce: heat the oil, add green cardamom and bay leaf and let it crackle for 30 seconds or so, add the onions and cook until golden brown. Add the ginger and garlic paste and stir for a minute. Add the red chilli powder, cumin and coriander, turmeric and salt and cook for another minute or so. Add the tomato puree and cook for 6-8 minutes until mixture is reduced by 1/2. Add sugar and garam masala and finish with fresh coriander, single cream and lemon juice. Pour the sauce on a serving dish and arrange the omelette slices over it. Serve as either a main dish or as an accompaniment.

 

Tip: Add finely chopped vegetables like asparagus, olives, spinach or artichokes to the omelette if you liked. You may even be more experimental with the sauce adding curry leaves and coconut milk if you wanted to make it more interesting.

 

Chaat! issue 12 Published

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With Easter upon us we thought egg recipes would be ideal for the holiday nice and quick!

Serves: 2

Cooking time: 9 minutes

Ingredients

Chaat! Magazine Sponsor Product Suggestion by East End Foods = Garam Masala

4 large British Lion eggs, hard-boiled

2-3 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 onion, finely chopped

3-4 cloves garlic, finely chopped

3cm piece ginger, grated

1-2 green chillies, finely chopped

½ tablespoon tomato purée

¼ teaspoon sea salt

3/4 teaspoon turmeric powder

½ teaspoon ground cumin

½ teaspoon ground coriander

3/4 teaspoon garam masala

1 tomato, finely chopped

200ml coconut milk

100g petite pois

2 tablespoons coriander leaves, chopped

Chapattis or rice to serve

Method

  1. Remove the shell from the boiled eggs (Gizzi uses free range), halve & put aside. Blend the oil, onion, garlic, ginger, green chillies and spices together. Heat a wok and add the paste and fry for 3-4 minutes.

 

  1. Add the tomato, coconut cream and peas and simmer for 5 minutes. For the last 2 minutes of cooking add the boiled eggs. Serve the egg curry hot, garnished with coriander leaves, with chapattis or rice.

Chaat magazine issue 12

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Wing Yip’s Beef and Broccoli in Oyster Sauce is a perfect choice for a healthy dinner during a January detox. The broccoli in the dish is super nutrient rich, while protein packed beef is a great source of vitamin B.

Wing Yip is the UK’s largest oriental supermarket chain, bringing authentic Oriental ingredients to British kitchens. From flavoursome Asian sauces and pastes to traditional rice noodles and Oriental teas, Wing Yip is a one-stop shop for authentic Pan-Asian cuisine

Beef and Broccoli in Oyster Sauce

Serves 2

Ingredients:

340g beef steak (sirloin or fillet steak)

2tsp Wing Yip Light Soya Sauce

2tsp sesame oil

1tsp corn flour

284g broccoli (cut into florets and blanched)

Chaat Sponsor Product Suggestion from The East End Foods Range

www.store.eastendfoods.co.uk

2tsp minced ginger (or fresh)

75ml Wing Yip Oyster Sauce

2tbsp peanut oil

Method:

  1. Cut the beef thinly across the grain and season with light soya sauce, sesame oil and a little cornflour.
  2. Clean and blanch the broccoli florets.
  3. Heat the peanut oil in a wok and fry the ginger and broccoli together. Remove from wok and set aside.
  4. Turn up the heat and add the beef in batches to seal the meat.
  5. Add the Oyster sauce and broccoli and stir well. If you prefer your beef pink, now is time to turn off the heat. Alternatively continue cooking for another 2 minutes.

 

Wing Yip has four superstores located in Birmingham, Cricklewood, Croydon and Manchester which stock more than 4,500 authentic Oriental groceries and products. Its online store www.wingyipstore.co.uk

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It’s said that life begins at 40, yet while some men buy the sports car or embark on a change of image, when celebrity chef Tom Kerridge passed that famous age milestone he decided he needed to alter his lifestyle in order to make the most of his middle years.

“I think when people get to 40 a great number end up taking a long look at themselves – they start to think about where they’ve gone, what they’ve done, what they’ve achieved and where they are going in the future,” the owner of Marlow’s two-Michelin-starred gastropub The Hand and Flowers explains. “From a health point of view, I definitely wasn’t in a great place and I needed to change that. So it hadn’t altered where I was, and I don’t think it was having an effect on my life and personality, but health-wise it was something I needed to recognise in myself and change for the better.”

 

What Kerridge decided on was a low-carb diet regime that, three years later, has resulted in over 11st of weight lost. This ‘Dopamine Diet’, as he terms it in his new book, was crafted specially to give readers the chance to get fit while still eating food that not only tastes fantastic but makes you feel great as well.

 

“It’s a personal story; I’ve already been there and done it, so it’s little tips on how I did it myself,” Kerridge says. “It’s the difference between being told not to do it and being shown how not to do it by someone who has already lost 11st and has done it the right way – the way that worked for me, at least. If just one person buys into it then the book has been worth doing, because it means it has helped that one person change their life.”

 

Despite undergoing an impressive physical transformation, Kerridge is adamant that his new focus on low-carb cooking hasn’t changed his relationship with Great British cooking in any way.

 

“It just embraces everything I already do,” he says of the Dopamine Diet. “The things that will help drive flavours of food forward – that is really important to me, so it has helped reinforce everything I already know. It’s very protein-led, so the roasts are still there, the stews are still there, and curries – that sort of spicing of dishes – is all still there.”

 

When it comes to curries, Kerridge is effusive – and the hotter, the better, he enthuses. He explains this is because when we eat spicy chillies our brains are tricked by the heat into releasing endorphins, which results in a natural high. His curry dishes make use of homemade sauces stuffed full of his favourite spices – curry leaves, turmeric, paprika and his secret ingredient, vinegar. “The acidity of the vinegar complements the spice fantastically,” he reveals.

 

And the prevalence of great Indian cooking these days only serves to further fuel Kerridge’s undying passion for the UK’s diverse restaurant industry.

 

“The year after we won the National Restaurant Award, the next winner was a fantastic curry house called Gymkhana,” he says. “It shows how great the culinary scene in this country is now – number one was a pub and then a curry house!”

TRY EAST END FOODS CURRY POWDER WITH THIS RECIPE

RECIPE:

Curried Cauliflower Soup – Serves 4

Ingredients:

50g dried onion flakes

2 tbsp vegetable oil

50g butter

1 onion, diced

2 garlic cloves, grated

1½ tbsp curry powder

1 chicken or vegetable stock cube

1 large cauliflower (about 800g), broken into florets

200ml coconut cream

200g cream cheese

4 tbsp chopped coriander, tender stems and all

2 hot green chillies, sliced, seeds and all

Finely grated zest of 1 lime

Sea salt and cayenne pepper

 

Recipe:

Preheat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/gas 4. Scatter the onion flakes on a baking tray. Trickle on the oil, give it a stir and season with salt. Bake for 5 minutes, or until onion flakes are golden brown, then set aside to cool.

 

In a large saucepan, melt the butter over a medium-low heat. Add the onion and the garlic and sweat gently, stirring from time to time, for around 10-15 minutes until soft. Sprinkle on the curry powder and cook, stirring for 2-3 minutes.

 

Now pour in 1 litre of water and crumble in the stock cube. Bring to the boil and add the cauliflower florets. Turn the heat down to a simmer and cook for 5-10 minutes, until the cauliflower is soft.

 

Stir in the coconut cream and cream cheese until fully combined. Bring back to the boil and then take the pan off the heat.

 

Blitz with a stick blender, or in a jug blender or food processor. If you’ve time, pass the soup through a sieve into a clean pan at this point – this will give the soup an unbelievably silky and delicious texture. Warm gently and season to taste with salt and cayenne pepper.

 

Ladle the soup into warmed bowls and scatter over the toasted onion flakes, coriander and chilli, then sprinkle with the lime zest.

– Serves 4

Ingredients:

50g dried onion flakes

2 tbsp vegetable oil

50g butter

1 onion, diced

2 garlic cloves, grated

1½ tbsp curry powder

1 chicken or vegetable stock cube

1 large cauliflower (about 800g), broken into florets

200ml coconut cream

200g cream cheese

4 tbsp chopped coriander, tender stems and all

2 hot green chillies, sliced, seeds and all

Finely grated zest of 1 lime

Sea salt and cayenne pepper

 

Recipe:

Preheat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/gas 4. Scatter the onion flakes on a baking tray. Trickle on the oil, give it a stir and season with salt. Bake for 5 minutes, or until onion flakes are golden brown, then set aside to cool.

 

In a large saucepan, melt the butter over a medium-low heat. Add the onion and the garlic and sweat gently, stirring from time to time, for around 10-15 minutes until soft. Sprinkle on the curry powder and cook, stirring for 2-3 minutes.

 

Now pour in 1 litre of water and crumble in the stock cube. Bring to the boil and add the cauliflower florets. Turn the heat down to a simmer and cook for 5-10 minutes, until the cauliflower is soft.

 

Stir in the coconut cream and cream cheese until fully combined. Bring back to the boil and then take the pan off the heat.

 

Blitz with a stick blender, or in a jug blender or food processor. If you’ve time, pass the soup through a sieve into a clean pan at this point – this will give the soup an unbelievably silky and delicious texture. Warm gently and season to taste with salt and cayenne pepper.

 

Ladle the soup into warmed bowls and scatter over the toasted onion flakes, coriander and chilli, then sprinkle with the lime zest.

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Born out of a shared love of Sri Lankan cuisine, Sri-Licious is the creation of close friends Mary and Callie. Based in Gloucestershire, we serve up fresh, tasty Sri Lankan food from a converted catering transit van at street food fairs and festivals in the South West and Midlands.

Having grown up in Sri Lanka, the cuisine had been Mary’s favourite food since an early age. When Mary suggested Callie visit the country it quickly became hers too!

You can hear the clanging of blades coming from the Sri-Licious van as homemade roti, fresh vegetables and spices are chopped on the griddle while the popular street food dish Kottu Roti is prepared to order. Vegan at base, there are several different toppings on offer, such as devilled paneer, devilled tofu or pineapple.

 

The pair  serve various Sri Lankan specialities including egg hoppers and ‘short eats’ – Sri Lankan snacks, such as vegetable roti parcels, or Seeni buns, bread rolls stuffed with sweet and spicy onion sambol. We caught up with Mary and Callie to find out a bit more about their Sri-lankan street food. The

 

  • How did the idea of Sri-licious come about? Did you cook lots of Sri-Lankan cuisine at home already, or was it a completely ‘from scratch’ endeavour?

As well as constantly cooking Sri Lankan food at home, we kept traveling to London to get our Sri Lankan food fix as there were no restaurants nearby us! We had also always loved the street food scene, going to markets in Birmingham and Bristol regularly and wanted to get involved!

  • What was the first Sri Lankan dish you fell in love with?

Egg hoppers, they are so different to anything else we have ever tried and you can cater them to your palette with a variety of tasty sambols! are made with a batter of rice flour and coconut milk, cooked in a bowl shaped pan with an egg poached inside, and they then add different sambols and chutneys; from fiery chili and onion to fragrant coconut and lime.

  • Who are your customers?

Our customers are the best! Adventurous foodies who are happy to try something different, or fellow Sri Lanka lovers who have visited the country on holiday and want to reminisce about the island’s culinary delights.

  • For anyone who hasn’t tried Sri-Lankan food before, what would you recommend to try first?

‘Short Eats’ are a great introduction as they sum up the combination of Sri Lankan spices and European influences that make the cuisine so unique, and as they’re only small, you can try lots!

  • What is your favourite dish and why?

It’s so hard to choose just one! It would probably have to be Kottu Roti as we find it is the perfect comfort food!

  • Do you have a nice simple recipe our readers can try at home themselves?

Kottu Roti Recipe (serves 4)

 

This is a simplified version of the Kottu Roti we serve up from our trusty van!

TRY EAST END FOOD GARAM MASALA FOR THIS RECIPE

 

Kottu Roti

Ingredients

8 Rotis

500g carrots

1kg spring greens

3 bell peppers

1 green chili (or more if you like it hot!)

2 tsp garam masala

Thumb sized piece of ginger

1 large white onion

2 tbsp vegetable oil

Sprig of fresh curry leaves (optional)

2 eggs (optional)

Salt to taste

 

Finely chop the onion and set aside. Coarsely chop the roti bread, peppers and spring greens so they are slightly smaller than bite size. Either use a julienne slicer to shred the carrots, or use a grater to grate them. Use a garlic press to crush the garlic, or finely chop it. Finely chop the green chili and ginger.

 

Heat the oil on a griddle, or if you don’t have a griddle you can use a large pan (such as a wok) to a hot heat, this is sort of like a Sri Lankan stir fry so everything will be cooked quickly!

 

Add the chopped onion and let cook for a minute or so, add the garam masala and curry leaves (if using).

 

Add the chopped peppers, spring greens, crushed garlic, ginger, chili and let cook for a few minutes. If at any point it starts sticking, just add a little bit of water.

 

Add the chopped roti and julienned carrots, heat for a few more minutes until the vegetables are all cooked.

 

If using eggs, crack them into a small bowl and whisk, adding to the kottu mixture at the last minute, constantly stirring to make sure it coats the ingredients equally. Continue to stir for a minute or so until the egg is cooked through.

 

Salt to taste and serve up on four plates!

 

  • Finally, where can we find you?!

We pop up all around the South West and Midlands – just keep an eye on our website and social media pages. We’re also available for private events so do get in touch if you would like something deliciously different at your wedding or birthday party!

CHAAT ISSUE 29

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Today’s smoothies using smoothie makers or blenders can use a vast array of ingredients on your supermarket shelfs to include both fruit and vegetables, now all year round you can use all the very fresh ingredients that you have in your kitchen gardens and incorporate them into your daily diet!

 

10 Great Reasons to add smoothies to your diet!

  1. Get your daily allowance.Consuming the minimum portion of your daily five recommendations of fruits and vegetables can be a test. Blending a couple of servings of each into a smoothie helps ensure you meet your body’s daily nutritional needs.
  2. Quick and easy.Creating your own nutrient smoothie doesn’t take as long as preparing most meals, giving you more time for others things. Taking a smoothie with you is an additional convenient option, thus providing flexibility.
  3. Helping Digestion. Let your blender “bite and chew” your food and ease the burden on your digestive system while you simultaneously consume plenty of dietary fiber to ensure excellent digestion.
  4. Yes, eating healthy and tasting great can go hand in hand. With so many recipes to choose from, finding one or more pleasing to your palate is a breeze.
  5. Give your digestive system a break while adding detoxifying ingredients like watermelon, cucumber, mint, dandelion greens and kale into your smoothies to aid your body’s detoxification processes.
  6. Healthy eating education. Educate yourself on what comprises a healthy diet. This will allow you to make greater informed decisions when you are not blending,
  7. Help your immune system.Empowering your immune system by having greater fruit and vegetables in your diet.
  8. Brain Food.Give your brain all the vitamins and nutrients it needs to improve your mental clarity, focus, and memory. Say goodbye to brain fog.
  9. Reduce cravings. We all crave sweets and unhealthy foods from time to time. Reduce those cravings, with a healthy sweet fruit or vegetable alternative.
  10. Everyday Fun!Conjuring up different combinations of fruit and vegetables can be fun, get the whole family involved to enjoy the experience

Andrew James Family Fit Smoothie Maker

£24.99 www.andrewjamesworldwide.com

This is a handy prices and sized smoothie maker that can fit ideally in a modern kitchen. For us this was a simple gadget to use just one touch operation, there manual comes with lots of smoothie recipes to give you inspiration.  Easy to clean, use and then reuse. Can be used by all family members without having to learn complicated instructions. The actual blender jar doubles up as a sport bottle, but there is also two complimentary sport bottles that come with the smoothie maker to help you enjoy your smoothie out and about!

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Mild Pea and Sweet Potato Curry

Nutritional information

PER SERVING (4) 600 kcalories, 7g protein, 35g carbohydrates, 8g fat, 1g saturated fat, 7g fibre, 13g sugars, 0.04g sodium.

Nutrition – as well as the nutritional value of the Peas this recipe contains: vitamin A and beta carotene, B complex vitamins, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, calcium, magnesium, iron, selenium, zinc, manganese, potassium, quercitin, allicin, lycopene plus other antioxidants from the herbs and seasonings.

Ingredients

2 tbsp vegetable or rapeseed oil

500g sweet potato, peeled and cut into large dice

1 red onion, peeled and finely chopped

2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed

2 cm piece root ginger, peeled and finely chopped

1 tsp ground cumin

2 tbsp mild Korma curry paste

1 tin chopped tomatoes

200ml chicken / vegetable stock

sea salt and black pepper

300g frozen peas

Juice 1/2 lemon

Handful coriander, roughly chopped

To serve: naan bread, basmati rice, natural yoghurt, chutney / pickle

Method

Heat the oil in a large casserole or deep frying pan. Add the sweet potato and red onion and fry for 5 – 10 minutes, until the vegetables are starting to colour. Add the garlic and ginger and cook for a further minute. Add the ground cumin and curry paste and cook, stirring constantly, for another minute. Add the tinned tomatoes and blend in the stock. Season with sea salt and black pepper and bring to the boil.

Simmer gently for 20 minutes, stirring regularly and topping up with extra stock if necessary, until the sweet potato has softened and is cooked through. Stir in the frozen peas and cook for a further 3 minutes. Adjust the seasoning and add the lemon juice. Stir through the chopped coriander and serve with steamed basmati rice, warm naan bread, yoghurt and chutney.

Serves 4

Preparation Time 10 minutes

Cooking Time 30 minutes

Tips

The less water you use when cooking peas, the less vitamin C is lost. Steaming helps to conserve this vitamin.

When boiling frozen peas, add enough water to cover, bring to the boil and then cover and simmer for 3 minutes. To microwave 227 grams (8oz) of frozen peas add 15ml (1 tablespoon) of water, place in a non-metallic container and cover. Cook on full power for 4 minutes (750W) or 4 1/2 minutes (650W)

Launched by the Yes Peas! campaign and the British pea vining industry, Great British Pea Week (10 – 16th July), the National Awareness Week dedicated to peas, has returned for 2017, giving everyone a reason to celebrate peas this harvesting season.

The UK is the largest producer and consumer of frozen peas in Europe, with the average person in Britain eating nearly 9,000 peas per year. This July, approximately 700 pea growers will harvest 2 billion portions of peas to feed Britain for the year.

Great British Pea Week is here to celebrate British production of the nation’s favourite family vegetable and inform the Great British public about the dedication it takes every pea season to get billions of peas from field to fork.

Lasting an average of six to eight weeks, the harvesting process is a complex operation. Farmers work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week using viners to harvest, shell and transport the peas from field to frozen as quickly as possible – the majority in just 150 minutes.

Stephen Francis, member of the YesPeas! campaign, said: “Great British Pea Week is back for its second year to inspire the nation to cook with peas during harvest season and reconnect people with the important heritage and provenance of frozen peas and their fascinating journey from the field to our freezers.

“The locked in freshness of frozen peas means we can enjoy British peas all year round, however we hope to remind consumers that growing peas is a mainstay of livelihood many British farmers and very much a product of the seasons!

“Great British Pea Week is here to put peas firmly on the food agenda and give everyone a reason to enjoy this versatile and nutritional vegetable at the peak of the British harvesting season, as well as all year-round.”

The hi-tech machinery and exact precision needed during harvesting requires growers to collaborate to produce the crop. There are currently 18 farmer groups along the east coast of the UK, from Essex to North of Dundee who produce the wonderful pea. The east-facing seaboard and maritime climate is the perfect environment for growing superior quality peas.

Versatile and nutritious, frozen peas are a popular freezer essential and the Yes Peas! campaign is asking everyone to get involved this Great British Pea Week and get cooking with peas. TV chef and Yes Peas! ambassador, Rachel Green has created some recipes to inspire everyone this Great British Pea Week, available at www.peas.org.

 

 

ABOUT YES PEAS!

The highly successful Yes Peas! campaign, run by the British Growers Association and funded by growers, freezers and machinery companies from the vining pea sector, is in its eleventh year. The campaign aims to promote the versatility, provenance and nutritional benefits of frozen peas and engages with consumers to inspire them to use peas as an ingredient, as well as an accompaniment, to meals. The campaign is supported by hundreds of recipes developed by campaign ambassador and TV chef, Rachel Green, available at www.peas.org.

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Street food has become so popular over the last decade in the UK, but there are still many regions of street food still to be explored by UK diners, here is recipe from South Africa!

Bunny chow is simply a hollow bread roll stuffed with curry – not made with real bunny, but with tender pieces of stewed lamb. In its native South Africa it is often spooned into large hollowed-out loaves of bread, which are designed to be eaten with your hands – quite a challenge, even for the most dextrous! For ease of eating I prefer to use smaller rolls, so really hungry diners may want more than one.

Order your copy of Chaat! to get more recipes like this 

SERVES 4–8, ALLOWING 1–2 EACH, DEPENDING ON GREED

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

700g lamb leg steaks, cut into 3cm cubes

2 onions, roughly chopped

3 garlic cloves, chopped

4cm piece fresh root ginger, chopped

1 tablespoon cumin seeds

2 teaspoons fennel seeds

1–2 teaspoons dried chilli flakes, to taste

1 cinnamon stick

4 vine tomatoes, chopped

2 tablespoons garam masala

550–600g (around 2 large)

potatoes, peeled and cut into 3cm cubes

8 large crusty white bread rolls

salt and freshly ground black pepper

a small bunch of coriander, chopped, to garnish

1 small red onion, thinly sliced, to garnish

Spices for the recipe go to store.eastendfoods.co.uk/

Place the vegetable oil in a large, heavy-based pan and set over a high heat. When it’s hot, brown the lamb in 2 or 3 batches, transferring to a plate as you go. Set aside.

Add the onion, garlic and ginger to a food processor and whizz to a smooth paste, adding a tablespoon or two of cold water to help it along, if necessary.

Lower the heat on the empty pan and add the cumin, fennel, chilli flakes and cinnamon stick, frying for a few seconds until you can smell their aroma wafting up from the pan. Stir through the onion paste and fry for 10 minutes until starting to soften. Return all the meat and any juices to the pan, along with the tomatoes and garam masala. Season with salt and pepper, pour in 500ml water and bring to the boil. Cover with a lid, reduce the heat to low and simmer gently for about an hour, until the meat is nearly tender. Add the potatoes, re-cover and simmer for another 30 minutes or so until the potatoes are cooked.

While the curry is simmering, slice the tops off the bread rolls and scoop out the insides to leave a shell about 1cm thick all round. Reserve the insides for dunking in the curry.

When the curry has finished cooking, divide evenly between the hollow rolls. Garnish with a little coriander and a few onion slices and eat immediately – cutlery optional!

Credit: MasterChef: Street Food of the World by Genevieve Taylor with recipes from previous MasterChef winners worldwide (Absolute Press, £26)

Photography © David Loftus

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Anjula’s World of Daal! More recipes like this in issue 28 of Chaat! 

Daal’s the store cupboard ingredients that can trigger your taste buds and culinary skills!

Anjula’s tells Chaat!, “I have always loved daal; for me it’s the ultimate delicious comfort food. I’m not quite sure why many people in the UK don’t appreciate the myriad benefits of lentils and pulses. Not only are these beautiful gems full of nutritional value, they are affordable, sustainable and healthy. Chana daal, for example, is incredibly low in GI and is great for diabetics”.

If you search online for ‘black-eyed peas,’ you’ll find lots of results for the famous American hip-hop band as well as for these wonderful beans – that’s right, they are actually beans rather than peas. Known as ‘lobia’ in Hindi and Punjabi, black-eyed peas combined with coconut milk make this dish a real delight. You can use dry black-eyed peas, but do remember to soak them overnight. They are delicious eaten hot or cold and come with some impressive nutritional benefits.

Serves 4

Ingredients

Key Spices

1 Indian bay leaf

1 1 inch piece of cassia bark

1 tsp turmeric powder

1 tsp red chilli flakes

1 tsp crushed coriander seeds

1 tsp cumin seeds

Warming Spices

1 tsp fennel seeds

2 cloves

4 green cardamom, lightly bashed

Other Spices

1/2 tsp ajwain seeds

Wet Ingredients

2 tbs vegetable oil

2 onions, finely chopped

3 fresh tomatoes, chopped

2-3 green chillies, pierced

1 tsp fresh pulped ginger

2 tsp fresh pulped garlic

2 400 g tins of black-eyed peas, rinsed and drained

200 ml coconut milk

2 tbs tamarind paste

Sea salt to taste

1tsp grated jaggery

Garnish

Small bunch of fresh coriander, chopped

Method 

Heat a sauté pan, with a lid, on a medium heat and warm the vegetable oil. Add the onions and sauté for 3 minutes.

Add the Indian bay leaf, cassia bark and salt to taste. Continue to sauté for 5 minutes, then add the turmeric powder, red chilli flakes, tomatoes and jaggery. Stir well and continue to sauté gently on a low heat for 10 minutes.

Add the green chillies, garlic and ginger and sauté for 2 minutes.

Place a small pan on a low heat and gently warm the crushed coriander seeds, cumin seeds and ajwain seeds for 1 minute. Remove from the heat and add to the onions and tomatoes.

In the same small pan, warm the warming spices on a low heat for 1 minute. Set aside.

Add the black-eyed peas, stir really well and cook for 3 minutes.

Add the coconut milk, bring to the boil and immediately reduce to a simmer.

Add the warming spices and tamarind paste, then place the lid on the pan and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat, add the chopped coriander and serve with basmati rice.

Recipe by Anjula Devi

NB – remember to count the cloves and cardamoms in and then count them out again before serving.

 

Piercing your fresh chillies with a cocktail stick gives you more control over the warmth of your dish. If you like your dish hot, then simply chop the chillies rather than pierce them. 

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RE: GROW YOUR OWN CURRY
Welcome to the this years British Curry Club’s campaign to
encourage the public to “grow your own curry” ingredients!

This is the second year we invite primary schools to get involved in our “Grow Your Own Curry” campaign, along with help from our campaign partners, Chaat! Magazine, Sutton Seeds, East End Spices and Sweet Cherry Publishers. We also have celebrity chefs providing recipes for both schools and parents to cook up!

There can be nothing better than encouraging young people to enjoy gardening, and being able to use these fresh ingredients to cook their very own curry, either in school or at home! Global foods topic is encouraged by the primary schools educational curriculum.

Your school may already have a gardening patch or have some spare pots ready to grow your seeds in!

For your school to get involved it is very simple, all you have to do is:
b Use as many of the Sutton Seeds we have included with this letter
b Put the poster up in your school to spread the message of the campaign
b If your school has a Website, Facebook or Twitter post #Growyourowncurry
Plus if you would like to get involved in our nationwide competition with the chance of being one of three schools to win £200 and for one pupil to win £25 worth of of reading books provided by Sweet Cherry Publishing then register your involvement by returning the slip or email to [email protected] by the 30 June 2017, then by the 15 July send us letters/drawings from your pupils telling us about your schools vegetable path and how much they have enjoyed taking part in the schools gardening club.

Terms and conditions

  • Completed competition entry form must be returned by post or email
  • ([email protected]) by the 30 JUNE 2017.
  • All competition entrant schools must publically display #Growyourowncurry either on the schools website, Facebook or Twitter
  • School can use Sutton Seeds or other seeds the school may already be using for the schools gardening club/activities.
  • All schools sending in letters must make sure there is a clear covering letter stating the schools contact details and each letter is marked on the back with pupils name and class for traceability and letters to arrive by 15 July 2017, to the competition address below.
  • 3 winning schools will be chosen by the merit of pupil’s letters emphasizing the enjoyment of their schools gardening club; to receive £200 worth of books from Sweet Cherry Publishing.
  • No cash alternative will be offered in exchange for books. No alternative prize will be offered.
  • Books will be delivered to the UK school address on the entrant form, date of delivery to be confirmed.
  • One winning pupils from each winning school will be awarded a voucher for £25 where Sweet Cherry Publishing will deliver to the pupil via the school  contact details, and gardening club organiser, books to the value of £25 from the publishers range for the age group.
  • The decision of the British Curry Club and the campaign partners are final.
  • Competition in partnership with all campaign partners.
  • Entrants must be primary schools from the UK.
  • Entrant forms and posters can be requested by contacting [email protected]
  • All schools sending in letters from pupils must be primary age pupil and be UK residents.
  • For details of the prize winner, please contact the competition owner [[email protected] or British Curry Club 6 Bute Crescent, Cardiff, CF10 5AN]

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This rich and flavoursome veggie stew is a great way to experiment with your rice cooker, demonstrating that this must-have kitchen gadget can do more than serve up bowls of fluffy basmati. Autumnal veg and piquant spices create a wonderful, and surprisingly light, stew full of delicious flavours and delightful textures.

Vegetarian and vegan friendly, the slow cooked cumin and coriander spiced vegetables with pearl barley proves that hearty dishes needn’t rely on a meaty base.

Quick and easy to make, and a hit with the whole family; this recipe is great for a midweek meal. Using a lot of kitchen essentials and spice rack mainstays, the recipe won’t add a great deal of burden on your weekly shopping list. Plus, if you’ve got young children, this is a great way of getting them to eat a number of veggies they’re usually reluctant to sample.

We’d recommend serving this dish with fresh, crusty bread on the side – great for dipping, scooping and wiping – making sure you don’t miss any of the wonderful spice. Serve direct from the rice cooker, when the vegetables and pearl barley are piping hot.

Here is the recipe for slow cooked cumin and coriander spiced vegetables with pearl barley.

Cook Time: 30 Minutes

Servings: 4-6 People

Ingredients:

  • 1 small squash (peeled, cut into chunks)
  • 2 cups fine beans (topped, tailed and halved)
  • 2 courgettes (sliced)
  • 2 leeks (sliced)
  • 5 carrots (peeled and sliced)
  • 1 medium red onion (sliced)
  • 600g chopped tomatoes
  • 80g pearl barley
  • 1tsp cumin seeds
  • 1tsp coriander seeds
  • 1tsp dried chilli flakes
  • 3 cups vegetable stock
  • 2tbsp vegetable oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Crusty bread (to serve)

Method:

 Using your rice cooker, sauté the carrots, courgettes, squash and red onion in the vegetable oil.

  1. After a couple of minutes, add the chopped tomatoes, pearl barley, spices and vegetable stock.
  2. Switch to cook mode and cover, cooking for 15 minutes.
  3. Stir in the leeks and beans, cover again and cook for a further 10 minutes.
  4. Serve with the fresh, crusty bread.

Original recipe from: www.crockpot.co.uk

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For anyone looking forward to enjoying a Christmas with a difference, chef and author, Anjula Devi, has created a Christmas feast with hints of carefully selected spices, all containing amazing health properties. Anjula’s Christmas banquet features:

  • Caramelised carrots with chilli flakes, jaggery and smoked ginger juice. Finished with a drop of orange liquor.
  •  Sticky parsnips with maple syrup and mandarin peel. Finished with nigella seeds.
  •  Roast potatoes with burnt garlic, cumin and red onion.
  •  Brussels sprouts with crushed coriander seeds, fennel and twice-roasted chestnuts in butter and garlic.
  •  24 hour marinated roast turkey with garlic, cumin, roasted dry crushed chillies, crushed coriander seeds, natural yogurt, pomegranate, lemon zest and juice. Finished with fresh chopped   coriander.
  •  Sausages wrapped in bacon, with caramelised shallots and fenugreek leaves
  •  Cranberry sauce with a hint of star anise and black peppercorns.
  •  Bread sauce with cinnamon, cloves, bay leaf and roasted onion. Finished with a little chilli oil.

Celebrated chef and champion of authentic Indian cooking, Anjula Devi is head of her own eponymous ‘Authentic Indian Cookery School’. Anjula has never been one to follow the crowd, and she loves creating healthy and unique recipes.

This talent began as a gift shared by her beloved father during a childhood in which he imparted all of his culinary wisdom. The essential spices, which form the foundation of much traditional Indian cuisine, remain central to Anjula’s culinary approach. The fifty-year-old Tiffin tin, which her father took with him to work every single day, is always close by, even today.

Speaking about Indian cuisine, Anjula says “There is a whole treasure chest of recipes, flavour combinations and beautiful ingredients which are often completely neglected, along with all of their amazing health benefits. All of my recipes are balanced and healthy; I love cooking with fresh vegetables. I want to inspire as many people as possible to cook delicious, healthy food, just like my father did all those years ago.”

Anjula’s Indian inspired Christmas dishes make a great alternative to traditional roast dinners.

Anjula has a ‘How To’ cookery book and range of Anjula Devi cooking utensils currently online and in Lakeland stores throughout the UK. http://www.lakeland.co.uk/anjula

Her new cookery book ‘Spice for Life’ is being released in spring 2017

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These are old-fashioned, lacy, gingery brandy snaps filled with cream. They’re relatively easy to make – the fiddly bit is the shaping and filling that follows – just remember to give them plenty of space while they’re in the oven and get to the shaping soon after they come out.

Ingredients

125g unsalted butter

125g light soft brown sugar

125g golden syrup

4 tsp lemon juice

125g plain flour, sifted

1 tsp ground ginger

For the cream

600ml double cream

1 tbsp icing sugar

1 tbsp orange flower water

the zest of 1 orange

Makes 15-20

  • Preheat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/gas mark 4.
  • Stir the butter, sugar, golden syrup and lemon juice in a
pan over a moderate heat until the butter has melted and all the sugar has dissolved. Remove from the heat and stir in the flour and ginger, mixing to a smooth paste.
  • Once the mixture is completely cool, roll in to walnut-sized balls. Press them on to a greased tray, spacing them well apart as they will spread.
  • Bake for 5-7 minutes, until golden brown a­nd lacy. Allow them to relax for a second or two, then mould them in to
a tube shape by gently wrapping them round the handle of a wooden spoon. If they cool before you can mould them, put them back in the oven for a minute to soften again.
  • Whip the double cream and gently fold in the icing sugar, orange flower water and orange zest. Shortly before serving, put the cream in a large piping bag and fill each brandy snap. Stack them, Jenga-style, on a plate and serve immediately, while they’re chewy and crispy.

 

Bill’s was founded as a fresh produce shop and café in Lewes, East Sussex by greengrocer Bill Collison in 2000. There are now over 70 restaurants across the UK, serving British classics made with fresh and locally sourced ingredients.

They’ve recently launched a new menu which will run throughout October and November, serving warming dishes such as sticky toffee apple pork ribs, wild mushroom soup and apple and salted caramel walnut crumble. The menu will be available at all sites throughout the UK.

The recipe is from Bill’s Cook Eat Smile cookbook, sold in all Bill’s stores and on Amazon. RRP £20.

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Asharaf Valappil, head chef at London’s Daawat Restaurant at the Strand Palace Hotel dawat1

Asharaf’s nomination comes at an exciting time for the Daawat Restaurant. A revolutionary summer menu with inspirations drawn from all over the sub-continent has been rapturously received by both critics and guests, many of whom have returned several times to make sure they have tasted the whole menu.

One recent trip advisor reviewer described Daawat as “The best Indian I’ve ever eaten” and a “hidden gem.” Now the team are hard at work planning a menu re-fresh for the winter months.

Another hit has been the Indian Afternoon Tea – believed to be the first in London – which sits alongside a traditional English Afternoon Tea available elsewhere in the hotel.

Food at Daawat includes fiery Chilli Mili Chicken Wings, Sea Bass with flavours taken from chef’s native Karala province and his take on a classic Chicken Tikka Masala. Lamb Biryani sits on the menu alongside Grandma Kodi Kura (Andrha-style chicken curry) based on a family recipe.

“Tiffin” style Indian afternoon tea features the Bombay burger, which was recently named as one of the best burgers in the UK, Paneer bread pakora, mango burfi and chocolate samosas with mango coulis.

Two-course Thali lunches from £9.95

Three-course pre-theatre dinners from £22.00

Afternoon tea from £29.95 pp.

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image003

The nation will once again be overrun with curry-licious treats in celebration of the 19th annual National Curry Week.

1

Kingfisher Beer, as proud partners of this fantastic occasion, are collaborating with tip-top chef, the Urban Rajah, to rustle up a range of the most ravishing Indian recipes that are all superbly simple to make and can be perfectly paired with a refreshingly cool pint of India’s finest.

These delicious delights can be found on their official Facebook pages during National Curry Week – @KingfisherBeerUK & @UrbanRajah

        

If this wasn’t enough to get you into the kitchen and cooking up a storm, then Kingfisher, the Real Taste of India, are offering one fab foodie fan the chance to win a hamper full of incredible ingredients to recreate their favourite National Curry Week recipe – and of course, a case of India’s No.1 to wash it down with!

To enter, all you must do is ‘Like’ the Kingfisher Beer UK Facebook page and comment on the recipe you’d love to cook most… Our wonderful winner will be selected on Monday 17th October 2016.

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For all the #Gin Lovers for #Scotland and afar

The map includes nine Scottish gins created in the last year with two, McQueen and Persie, launching just last week.

The map is a celebration of Scottish gin which has rocketed in popularity in recent years, threatening to overtake whisky as Scotland’s national drink.

Gin Map of Scotland

In time for World Gin Day on 11th June, the Map aims to encourage gin lovers to be adventurous with their G&T and explore the impressive range of Scottish gins available.

The colourful infographic (or ginfographic) includes the name of the gin, where it is from, its botanicals, and recommended garnishes.

The gins featured include world famous brands such as Hendrick’s to small operations like Jinzu, created by bartender Dee Davies whose Jinzu recipe won a Diageo run competition.

It highlights the creativity and resourcefulness in creating Scottish gin, with botanicals varying from sugar kelp in the Isle of Harris Gin to hand foraged Stirlingshire nettles in the Stirling Gin, with many distillers utilising local produce.

Each gin on the map includes the garnish recommended by the producer to best compliment their gin, with examples ranging from frozen raspberries for Eden Mill Love Gin to kiwi for Shetland Reel gin.

The Map is a 2016 update of last year’s hugely popular 5pm Gin Map of Scotland which was widely shared online.

Scottish gin

No longer an artisan fad, gin is a major player in the Scottish economy with gin bringing £1.76bn to the UK economy, 70% of which is produced in Scotland.

Scots drank 29 million litres of gin last year with 42% consumed by 18 to 34 year olds and 27% by over 45s with Edinburgh drinking more gin than any other city in the UK.

Scottish gin is now shipped to 139 countries and St Andrews distiller Eden Mill recently secured a £1.5m deal to distribute their gin in China.

Ronnie Somerville, 5pm Founder said: “As a restaurant bookings website, we always enjoy the opportunity to champion Scottish food and drink and Scottish gin has experienced a phenomenal rise recently.”

“With Scotland’s rich history of distilling matched with the best natural larder in the world, the growth of locally created Scottish gin feels like a natural progression.”

“This World Gin Day we encourage gin lovers to take ginspiration from our Gin Map of Scotland, fill up their glass with a cold G&T, and make it a Scottish one.”

Embed the map on your site here

.

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Bastion of all that is gloriously British.

Where mugs of tea are sipped over rows of cabbages. Gossip is swapped. Boots muddied. Worms cajoled and stress relieved. Yep, we all know gardening is great for our health, but did you know just half an hour of gardening a week can deliver long-term benefits for body and mind?

Let’s raise a glass to science with this fresh new cocktail: The Allotment.

It’s wild, green things, with a touch of the exotic. Where punchy passion fruit jostles with sprigs of mint, a drape of basil and the sweet, delicate earthiness of a freshly dug cucumber.  And not forgetting some delicious gin. (Because no decent potting shed is complete without a bottle of the botanical stuff).

Make it like this:

The Allotment 

  • 3 mint leaves
  • 3 basil leaves
  • 75ml Passionfruit Coulis
  • 100ml Qcumber water
  • 1 part gin

Muddle your mint and basil leaves in a long tall glass with your favourite gin. Add crushed ice and the passion fruit coulis, then top with sparkling Qcumber water. Tin mug and flask optional.

-ends-

Editor’s Notes

  • Qcumber is available at Tesco, Booths, Planet Organic, Ocado, Harrods, Selfridges & Co and other quality food stores.
  • Qcumber was born out of one of those rare ‘eureka’ moments. One summer’s evening Graham Carr-Smith was enjoying a gin with slices of crisp cucumber and the thought came to him “this could be the next drink flavour” After a lot of hard work, Qcumber was born.
  • The quality of the water is fundamental to the taste of Qcumber. The source of the spring water lies in the old county of Radnorshire in Mid Wales. In this unspoilt rural area, the water is able to filter naturally through layers of rock to achieve its exceptional taste and purity.
  • Qcumber contains only natural ingredients and is free from artificial sweeteners, colours, preservatives and flavourings. The ingredients are: carbonated spring water, natural cucumber extract, beet sugar, citric acid.
  • Great on its own, Qcumber is also the perfect mixer with gin and vodka, or with Pimms.
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Dear Gardening Club,

RE: Grow Your Own Curry

Over the last couple of years British Curry Club has enjoyed a summer campaign to encourage the public to “grow your own curry”, ingredients!

This year we would like primary schools to get involved in our, “Grow Your Own Curry” campaign, along with help from our campaign partners,  Chaat! Magazine, Sutton Seeds, East End Spices and  Sweet Cherry Publishers,

There can be nothing better than encouraging young people to enjoy gardening, and then using the fresh ingredients to be cook their very own curry either in school or at home! Global foods topic is encouraged by the primary schools educational curriculum.

Your school may already have a gardening patch or have some spare pots ready to grow your seeds in!

For your school to get involved it is very simple, all you have to do is:

  • Use as many of the Sutton Seeds we have included with this letter (if you have already recieved a pack or simply use your own seeds)
  • Put the poster up in your school to spread the message of the campaign
  • If your school as a Website, Facebook or Twitter post #Growyourowncurry

Plus if you would like to get involved in our nationwide competition with the chance of being one of three schools to win £200 and for one pupil to win £25.00 worth of of reading books provided by Sweet Cherry Publishing then register your involvement by returning the slip or email to [email protected] by the 31 May 2016, then by the 1  July send us letters from your pupils telling us about your schools vegetable path and how much they have enjoyed taking part in the schools gardening club.

Best wishes,

Rosena Alim British Curry Club Team

Terms and conditions

  • Completed competition entry form must be returned by post or email Gardening_Letter_NEW SECOND EXTENTED LETTER 2 GYOC([email protected]) by the 31 May 2016.
  • All competition entrant schools must publically display #Growyourowncurry either on the schools website, Facebook or Twitter
  • School can use Sutton Seeds or other seeds the school may already be using for the schools gardening club/activities.
  • All schools sending in letters must make sure there is a clear covering letter stating the schools contact details and each letter is marked on the back with pupils name and class for traceability and letters to arrive by 1 July 2016, to the competition address below.
  • 3 winning schools will be chosen by the merit of pupil’s letters emphasizing the enjoyment of their schools gardening club; to receive £200 worth of books from Sweet Cherry Publishing.
  • No cash alternative will be offered in exchange for books. No alternative prize will be offered.
  • Books will be delivered to the UK school address on the entrant form, date of delivery to be confirmed.
  • One winning pupils from each winning school will be awarded a voucher for £25 where Sweet Cherry Publishing will deliver to the pupil via the school  contact details, and gardening club organiser, books to the value of £25 from the publishers range for the age group.
  • The decision of the British Curry Club and the campaign partners are final.
  • Competition in partnership with all campaign partners.
  • Entrants must be primary schools from the UK.
  • Entrant forms and posters can be requested by contacting [email protected]
  • All schools sending in letters from pupils must be primary age pupil and be UK residents.
  • For details of the prize winner, please contact the competition owner [[email protected] or British Curry Club 6 Bute Crescent, Cardiff, CF10 5AN]

eef sutn logo_cmyk_alt  small   Logo chaat-magazine-logo-dec15 unnamed

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More and more consumers are looking at food hygiene ratings when deciding where to eat. Seeing a green and black sticker in the window could make the difference between them choosing where to eat.

So get your favourite restaurants and takeaways to feel pride in their FSA sticker. Help them not to lose out by leaving potential customers to guess their hygiene standards or assume  they may have something to hide.

Enter the competition now!

Rating 5_a (1)

Terms and conditions apply

Closing date is midnight 30 April 2016!

  • Each entrant’s tweet, Facebook post or Instagram must include the photo of the Food Hygiene Rating Scheme sticker and the hashtag#WheresTheStickerChaat
  • Entrant’s must also mention the food business’s Twitter handle, Instagram handle or tag them on Facebook (their trade name is also acceptable if the food business is not on social media)
  • Entrants can enter multiple businesses, using a separate entry for each one. Multiple entries by the same entrant for the same business will be disregarded.
  • Only businesses in England displaying a current and valid food hygiene rating sticker showing a rating of 3, 4 or 5 will be eligible for the prize draw
  • The customer will receive £500 and the business will receive £500. The payment will be made by The British Curry Club. No alternative prize will be offered.
  • The validity of the food hygiene rating of the business will need to be verified by the Food Standards Agency before the winner is confirmed, announced and paid.
  • The decision of the British Curry Club and the FSA is final.
  • Competition in partnership with the FSA
  • Entrants must be 18 years of age and over and full time UK residents
  • For details of the prize winner, please contact the competition owner [[email protected] or British Curry Club 6 Bute Crescent, Cardiff, CF10 5AN]

Order your copy of Chaat! now!

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Arun Kapil has his own spice blend range – Green Saffron – and now his new book Fresh Spice. His love of spices jumps out of the pages as you browse through. A great gift for the season with lots of recipes using both winter and summer produce. With heaps of personal twists on traditional recipes such as a Lamb Biryani Ka Kesar (with saffron), cauliflower cheese with spiced mornay sauce; there is plenty to entice you with.

We have copies of Arun’s new book Fresh Spice up for grabs; if you would like to enter the competition this is how you can! Three ways.

EMAIL: Send your details to competition @britishcurryclub.co.uk with “ARUN” in the subject line
FACEBOOK: ‘Like’ our page and share our competition post
TWITTER: Re-tweet our competition post and follow us
CLOSING DATE: 30th JULY 2015

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chaat-magazine-issue-20-2Chaat!’’s top ten aphrodisiac
fun foods will steam up more
than your kitchen windows
this this season. If you are
thinking about wooing a
special person, sneak some
of the following into your
breakfast, lunch or evening
meal!

The food of love! To subscribe to Chaat! Click Here

CHILLIES ♥♥♥♥♥
Hot chillies release endorphins which increase
blood circulation and stimulate nerve endings,
so you’ll be sensitised as well as a little flushed.
A vital ingredient to ensure you’re both burning
with desire!

CHOCOLATE ♥♥♥♥♥
Chocolate has been said to contain chemicals
that provoke feelings of happiness and
euphoria, and its traces of tryptophan help
to nudge the brain into arousal. Perfect for
melting and dipping to get you into a state of
sweet, sticky ecstasy!
BANANAS ♥♥♥♥
This fruit is bursting with potassium which
aids in strengthening muscles to enhance
contractions. Don’t worry; we’re not so
immature that we’d mention its phallic shape
OYSTERS ♥♥♥♥
Slurping this shellfish has been linked to an
increased sex drive due to its high levels of zinc
RED WINE ♥♥♥♥
This remover of inhibitions contains
antioxidants that improve blood circulation.
Keep that red stuff flowing!
CARDAMOM ♥♥♥
Originating from India, this little pod is often
used as a medicine for sexual health. An
addition to a recipe that’s sure to spice up your
evening…
SALMON ♥♥♥
With all its omega-3 acids, salmon will keep the
level of sexual hormones high.
VANILLA ♥♥♥
Vanilla has an alluring scent which acts as
an instant aphrodisiac. Enjoy it in a delicious
dessert or a hot and steamy drink.
FIGS ♥♥♥
Quite literally the ‘fruit of your loins’; this sexual
stimulant was dubbed as a sacred fruit by the
Greeks for their love inducing properties and
resemblance to a certain female organ…
BASIL ♥♥♥
The secret to Italy’s romanticism lies in their
cooking! This herb boosts both your libido and
fertility.

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Something for the weekend ahead. A cuisine in its own right, food writer Sumayya Jamil explores Pakistan’s rich culinary history.

CHICKEN YAKHNI PULLAO

This is a rice dish that was always cooked on Sundays in my home. It’s warm, comforting and a complete meal on its own. The whole garam masala is added to the chicken with water create a stock – ‘yakhni’ which the rice and chicken both cook in. It’s best enjoyed with a simple raita made yoghurt, with salt, sugar, red chilli powder and fresh coriander and cucumber.
Serves 1
Ingredients
3-4 tbsp vegetable oil
2-4 medium onions, chopped into half rings
1 inch ginger, grated
1 tbsp fresh garlic paste
1 tsp sea salt, or to taste
1 green chilli (optional)
500 g whole skinless chicken, with bone, cut into 12 pieces
400 g whipped natural yogurt
500 g basmati rice, washed and rinsed then soaked for 30 minutes before cooking
Whole garam masalas:
2 tsp cumin
1 tsp coriander seeds
1 tsp black peppercorn
1 medium cinnamon stick
1 tsp aniseed
1 tsp cloves
1 black large cardamom
3-4 green cardamom
How to cook
 Heat about 2-3 tbsp of oil in a saucepan over medium heat and once the oil is hot pop in the garam masalas and allow to fry until you can smell their aroma (do not allow to burn!).
 Now add the onion half rings and fry on medium-low heat until caramelized and brown – this is important as these add sweetness to the rice and create the flavour for the yakhni (stock for the rice to cook in).
 Once the onions are brown add the ginger and garlic paste and cook until the raw garlic smell escapes. Now add the yoghurt and fry until the yoghurt dries up a bit.
 Add the chicken and fry until sealed, then drain rice and fry for a couple of minutes. Pop in the green chilli now (if desired). Add enough water to just about cover the rice and chicken and turn the heat low.
 Cover and cook in “dam”, under steam for about 10-15 minutes until the rice and just cooked. The liquid should be completely absorbed. Fluff up the rice in between cooking to avoid the rice from sticking to the pan. Use a fork! Finally, Serve with a cool raita.

Archive Chaat! Magazine Issue 11

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A SPICY CHRISTMAS DINNER WITH ALL THE TRIMMINGS

Gurpareet Bains has created  a three-course festive feast with fewer calories than a single bowl of mixed nuts. His “Guilt-Free Gala” contains a total of just 930 calories, over two-thirds less than the classic lunch.

It includes turkey with roast potatoes and all the trimmings, a lobster and vegetable starter, and a rich fruit pudding with mascarpone cheese for dessert.
Gurpareet, has replaced traditional, oily ingredients with healthy superfoods to reduce its calorific content by 71 per cent.
The entire meal also contains just 19 grams of fat. It is gluten-free and has more than double the recommended daily number of fruits and vegetables.
If you watch what you eat and drink for the rest of the day, opting for the Guilt-Free Gala dinner means most people will not exceed the recommended calorie intake of 2,500 for men and 2,000 for women.
According to research, many Britons will unwittingly consume up to 7,000 calories on Christmas Day alone, with the daily recommended allowance being swallowed before sitting down for dinner!
The endless supply of chocolate, snacks, mince pies and festive drinks also means the average Brit will gain 6lbs in the eight days between Christmas Eve and New Year’s Day.
But Gurpareet, the pioneer of ‘Indian Superfood’, has created a meal that he believes “satisfies the traditionalist – and the taste buds”.
The banquet includes a starter of butternut squash and Pear Soup with Lobster (150 calories), a main of Turkey Breast Poached in Mulled Wine Spices with Blueberry Sauce and all the trimmings (470 calories) and a dessert of Superfruit Pudding with Green Tea and Chia seeds (310 calories).
Gurpareet said: “It’s incredibly easy to go overboard at Christmas, but this meal means that we can still eat indulgently and try new flavours without worrying about the waistline.” His latest book ‘The Superfood Diet’ is published by Absolute Press/Bloomsbury.
How to cook Gurpareet’s three-course Guilt-Free Gala (serves 4)
Butternut Squash and Pear Soup with Lobster

450g butternut squash, diced
2 large pears, peeled, cored and diced
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1 chicken or vegetable stock cube
1 tsp cumin seeds
100g cooked lobster meat
chopped fresh dill, to garnish
freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Place the butternut squash, diced pears, chopped onion and stock cube in a large saucepan. Cover with 1 litre boiling water, and bring to a simmer. Cook, uncovered, for 30 minutes or until the butternut squash is soft, stirring occasionally. Blitz the soup until smooth.
Place the cumin seeds in a non-stick frying pan and heat on a medium heat until the seeds start to sizzle and pop – this should take no longer than 2 minutes. Mix the cumin seeds through the soup and reheat to serve.
Garnish with the lobster meat and dill. Season to taste with black pepper.
Vital Statistics (per portion):
150 kcal
1g fat
1g salt
 6.5g sugars
Turkey Breast Poached in Mulled Wine Spices

3 strips of orange rind
2 strips of lemon rind
4cm x 3cm piece of fresh root ginger, peeled
10 green cardamom pods, lightly crushed
5 cloves
2 cinnamon sticks
4 star anise
1 tsp coriander seeds
500g, turkey breast fillet
Place all the ingredients, except the turkey, in a deep saucepan and pour over 2 litres cold water. Heat until the water begins to bubble. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes.
After 10 minutes, uncover the pan and bring the water to a boil. Place the turkey breast into the water until it is submerged and return to the boil. Once the water begins to boil, take the pan off the heat and cover with a lid. Allow the turkey to sit in the water and poach for 3 hours (this stage of the process can be done in the morning).
Vital Statistics (per portion):
130 kcal
1.25g fat
0.065g salt
neg sugars
Blueberry Sauce
100g blueberries
10g coconut nectar
1 x clove
Pinch chilli
Pinch salt
25ml water
Place all the ingredients in a small pan and bring to a simmer. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Allow to cool before serving.
Vital Statistics (per portion):
24 kcal
neg fat
0.0035g salt
5g sugars
Turkey, Sage and Onion Cornmeal Stuffing
125g lean turkey thigh mince
2 small red onions, finely diced
1 small egg, lightly beaten
25g cornmeal
15g passata
¼ teaspoon smoked paprika
pinch ground chilli
10g fresh sage, finely chopped
5g fresh dill, finely chopped
freshly ground black pepper
Preheat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/Gas Mark 6.
Place all the ingredients in a large bowl, and knead together until well mixed. Divide the turkey mixture between 4 small silicone moulds or ramekins (which will need greasing).
Bake in the oven for 30 minutes.
Vital Statistics (per portion):
98 kcal
2g fat
0.05825g salt
2.5g sugars
Baby Roast Spuds with Seaweed and Rosemary Crust
1 tbsp coconut oil, melted
¼ tsp turmeric
1 tbsp finely chopped shredded dried seaweed/sea salad
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh rosemary leaves
300g baby new potatoes, halved
Preheat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/Gas Mark 7.
In a large bowl combine the coconut oil, turmeric, shredded seaweed and rosemary. Mix through the baby potatoes.
Place the spice-coated potatoes in a single layer on a baking tray. Bake in the centre of the preheated oven for about 35-40 minutes or until golden brown and cooked through, turning once after 15 minutes.
Vital Statistics (per portion):
65 kcal
2g fat
neg salt
1g sugars
Parnsip and Sweet Potato Mash
200g parsnips, diced
250g sweet potatoes, diced
1 clove garlic, crushed
25ml quark (skimmed milk soft cheese)
a pinch of ground nutmeg
2 tbsps chopped fresh chives
freshly ground black pepper
Steam the parsnips and sweet potatoes until soft. Place the steamed vegetables in a large mixing bowl. Add the garlic, and mash until smooth. Mix through the remaining ingredients.
Vital Statistics (per portion):
90 kcal
0.5g fat
neg salt
5.5g sugars
Steamed Kale, Baby Carrots and Brussel Sprouts
400g whole baby carrots
400g Brussel sprouts
100g kale
Steam the whole baby carrots and Brussel sprouts for 15 minutes. Add the kale and continue steaming for a further 7 minutes.
Vital Statistics (per portion):
65 kcal
neg fat
neg salt
8g sugars
No aded fat/sugar Superfruit Pudding with Green Tea and Chia Seeds

240g dried mixed fruit
20g dried goji berries
¼ tsp ground ginger
½ tsp ground cinnamon
A pinch ground chilli
140ml green tea, cooled
60g gram flour
¼ tsp baking powder
¼ tsp bicarbonate of soda
2 tsps chia seeds
Mascarpone cheese and grated lemon rind to serve
Place the dried mixed fruit, goji berries, ginger, cinnamon and chilli in a non-metallic mixing bowl. Pour the green tea over the fruit and mix well. Cover and allow to rest overnight.
Stir the gram flour, baking powder and bicarbonate of soda into the bowl of mixed fruit until it is combined thoroughly and turn the mixture into 4 small silicone moulds or ramekins (which will need greasing). Using the back of a spoon, push the mixture out to the sides of the moulds until even. Sprinkle chia seeds evenly on each pudding. Cover each mould tightly with cling-film. Steam for 1 hour.
Serve the puddings warm with a 1 tablespoon dollop each of mascarpone cheese and a sprinkle of lemon rind.
Vital Statistics (per portion):
310 kcal
12g fat
0.0535g salt
42g sugars

www.gurpareetbains.co.uk

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Send us your suggestion(s) and you could WIN a Ferns curry paste!

It’s Britain’s original top ten countdown of best loved curries. Disagree with the current standings? Vote in our TOP OF THE POPPADOMS and win a jar of FERNS authentic paste!

votenow

A huge thank you to everyone who got in contact to suggest the top ten Indian dishes to go on our Top of the Poppadoms Poll! And here is how it currently looks!

 

  1. MADRAS – We weren’t surprised to learn that this dish came out on top, knowing how popular it is in our own restaurant.
  2. BALTI – The Brummy invention loses the top spot but remains a firm favourite.
  3. BIRYANI – We can’t agree more; rice, meat or veg and curry sauce – what’s not to love?
  4. JALFREZI – The ‘Hot-Fry’ remains ever popular
  5. SAAG – Could the position of this dish be down to a new push for healthy eating?
  6. DHANSAK – Down 1 place, is the hot and fruity flavour losing favour?
  7. KORMA – Not going anywhere. The Korma retains its rating in our poll.
  8. CHICKEN TIKKA MASALA – A lot less popular this issue, it seems.
  9. KARAHI – We’d like to see a little more appreciation for this fabulous style of cooking.
  10. VINDALOO – It seems that Fat Les and his family haven’t been voting in TOTP.

 

DISAGREE WITH THE CURRENT STANDINGS? VOTE!

Tell us your favourite curry on the list and why you like it and you could WIN a Fern’s Curry Paste! Click the button below to vote…

votenow

 There are 3 ways to get in touch with your details – no contact – no win!! :

 Closing date is 30th April 2014 – Good Luck! (Please see T&Cs)

Ferns: The official sponsor of Top of the Poppadoms. Authentic curry pastes made in India since 1937. Each Ferns’ product is crafted into a delicious paste, enabling anyone to cook a fragrant, spice-infused Indian dish with ease and speed.

For more information, visit www.fernsofindia.co.uk

 

 

Terms and Conditions: Open to entrants with a UK postal address only. Delivery of competition prizes may take up to 30 days.

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National Curry Week was set up by its founders to really put the nations favourite dish on the map, curry has been loved by so many and the week brings along many local and national activities to raise money for much need charities across the country. This year’s National Curry week has been supported by Hungry House, Sainsbury’s and Kingfisher Beer!ccblogo

For Peter Grove, founder and organiser of the Curry Capital of Britain Awards, a great curry capital is one that revels in pride in community and the city. This is something that he thinks was perfectly showcased by last year’s winners; “Bradford encapsulated the ethos of the competition by including the public, the restaurants, business and even the youth in their bid. As a city they managed to promote a team atmosphere rarely seen before”.  Despite it being a closely run race and between Bradford and their arch-rivals, Glasgow the Scottish city was just pipped to the post, for 2014 who shall be the winner will it be Bradford again or is there a close contender the winner will be announced shortly!

According to Peter this award not only serves to showcase a city where great food is available, but also to help display the importance of the UK’s various ethnic communities and counter, ”the bad media coverage that often appears.” The award also helps the council and local community show their support for their city and their beloved curry houses.

This sense of community is something Peter believes that the awards have actively helped, “The curry industry is very competitive and prior to this competition it was rare to see restaurants working together or councils working on a one to one basis with the restaurants”.

Having travelled the length and breadth of the country Peter has sampled all sorts of curries, and he claims that each has its own special quality “The food at the 6 Michelin starred restaurants is amazing but then again there is nothing quite like a Tandoori House comfort curry.” However despite the varied and wonderful kinds of curry across the country, restaurants cannot simply rest on their laurels. “We now have Mexican, Thai and Latin American giving strong competition for the spicy pound and where once restaurants lead the supermarkets it is now the other way round with a greater diversity of dishes and products.”

We are all waiting to hear who will win Curry Capital of Britain 2014!

Chaat! magazine perfect for Curry Lovers!

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Perfect for Indian curry recipes the Black Cardamom (Amomum Subulatum) –

Grow your own curry challenge is still on and the black Cardmom seeds for this exotic spice is a definite plant that should be ticked off your list, as a Indian curry recipe ingredient plants4presents.co.uk have provided ours! Black Cardamom comes from an herbaceous perennial that is native to India and Asia. It is a culinary herb that is used in Chinese, Vietnamese and Indian cooking. Vikings are said to have taken the spice to Scandinavia where it is used in baking breads and pastries still to this day. In the Arabic culture, Cardamom is used to flavour coffees and teas. The flavour of Black Cardamom is said to be a dark, smoky flavour with a taste of camphor and mint.

The Cardamom spice is found in the dried seedpods and seeds. The small, brown-black sticky seeds are contained in pods which are collected just before maturity. Keep the Cardamom seed in its seedpods as husked seed and ground seed loses its flavour quickly. Always store it in an airtight container, ready for your next Indian curry recipe.

Order your Chaat! magazine subscription and get your free black cardamom plant now

These rare cardamom plants are the variety that produce the sought after black smoky pods used in cooking. It’s a bit of a challenge to get the pods in this country but they make attractive houseplants in their own right.  For 2014 Plants4presents have these black cardamom  plants in for our readers and are a real collector’s item and looking nice and strong as pictured. They will do best in a warm, not too bright spot indoors and they will grow on from year to year.

How To Grow Cardamom Seeds: Start the cardamom plant indoors in the winter. These herb seeds can be slow to germinate. Amomum subulatum is a clumping evergreen plant. It flowers from late spring through mid-summer. In the wild it is found growing under the shade of trees and in areas where there is plenty of moisture. Protect Cardamom herb plants from cold temperatures and freezing.

Characteristics: The pods are used as a spice, in a similar manner to the green Indian cardamom pods, but with a different flavour. Unlike green cardamom, this spice is rarely used in sweet dishes. Its smoky flavour and aroma derive from traditional methods of drying over open flames. Black Cardamom herb was used in Chinese medicine as a medicinal herb. It was said to treat stomach ailments and malaria. Cardamom is rich in vitamins and minerals. The essential oil is used as an antiseptic and local anesthetic.

Culinary uses: Black cardamom is often erroneously described as an inferior substitute for green cardamom by those unfamiliar with the spice; actually, it is just not as well suited for the sweet/hot dishes which typically include cardamom, and that are more commonly prepared outside the plant’s native range. Black cardamom, by contrast, is better for hearty curries, meat stews and similar dishes. Ideal for Indian curry recipes and much more..

 

 

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Our #growyourowncurry challenge for your Indian curry recipes still continues, Plants4presents are eager to get you started and happy to provide your free chilli plant when you subscribe to your food magazine subscription of  Chaat!  A great gift!*
 
We would love to see your garden images growing vegetables, fruit, and herbs, no matter how big or small your veg patch is or even if its just a pot. Share your images with us to share with our followers and show people what is possible.
You may have grown coriander, tomatoes, potatoes or more elaborate ingredients such as aubergines, peppers that some of us struggle to grow our team at Chaat! would love to see what you have put your green fingers to, tell us how easy or difficult the challenge has been and share your wealth of experience with us and our readers. Have you a circle of friends or your own allotment which is thriving from all the nurturing and the brilliant weather we have been having or is the sunny weather been too much for your delicate plants, the most simple of technique shared with others could add so much value to fellow gardeners so get in touch!
One of our Chaat! team is always trying to grow Bengali pumpkins/marrows every year she nurtures the seeds and worships the new seedling, but no real big vegetables ever grow and she’s not sure what she is doing wrong! Someone out there has probably had this problem and faced the challenge and won so tell us about the challenge!
 
Email your images stating
GROWYOUROWNCURRY to: [email protected]
there is a copy of Chaat! up for grabs each month for our favourite image.
 
Remember to tell us your name and town you live in! We will contact you by if you win to send you the a copy of your single issue of Chaat! your food magazine subscription prize
*chilli plant subscription is available until the end of August 2014!
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Something a little different from your usual samosa perfect Indian recipe idea with a twist. Super simple to make.

INGREDIENTS

500g beetroot

1/2 tsp mustard seeeds

1/2 tsp cumin seeds

1/4 tsp asafoetida

6-8 curry leaves

2 green chillies

6-8 tbsp grated coconut

1 pack of frozen Spring Roll or Samosa pastry (Available from most Asian supermarkets)

Oil, suitable for frying

Salt

4-5tbsp flour

2-3 tbsp water

 

METHOD

  1. Wash the beetroots, remove the leaves and boil, steam or pressure cook them until tender. Once cooled, dice into very small squares.
  2. Finely slice the curry leaves and green chillies and set aside.
  3. Heat 2 tbsp of oil and add the mustard seeds. Allow them to splutter then reduce the heat a little and add the cumin seeds. As soon as they change colour add the curry leaves and green chilli.
  4. Sauté  for a minute then add the asafoetida and, almost immediately after, the grated coconut. Continue to sauté, ensuring that you keep stirring from the bottom up, as once the coconut is added it will stick to the bottom. Use a flat wooden spatula.
  5. Once the coconut is dry and almost toasted, add the beetroot and sauté for a few minutes until the beetroot feels dry to the touch. Check seasoning, remove and cool.
  6. Thaw the unopened pack of frozen pastry. Take the pile of sheets out of the packing and place on a chopping board.
  7. Place a round side plate on top of the pastry and use as a template to cut the pastry slices into circles. Remove the side plate and cut the circles in half to create 2 piles of semi-circles.
  8. Make a paste from the flour and water. It should be thick like glue.
  9. Shape cones from two pastry semi-circles on top of each other. Fill with the stuffing, fold over until you have perfect triangles, then seal the edges with the flour and water glue.
  10. Heat the oil to deep fry once the batch is ready. Fry at roughly 180°C on all sides.
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The last couple of weeks Britain has had the perfect weather for growing the much loved chilli!

Say hello to the five domesticated species
of the genus Capsicum:

  • Capsicum annuum: The most common domesticated species; includes sweet peppers and the majority of garden grown chillies
  • Chinense: Generically known as ‘habaneros’; includes the hottest chillies ever measured.
  • Frutescens: Best known for the notorious Tabasco chilli.
  • Baccatum: Known as aji throughout South America.
  • Pubescens: Often called rocoto, these fruits have dark purple seeds.

Chillies are heat loving, long-lived plants that are started as transplants. Seeds must be sown early in the year; the emerging seedlings are then pricked out and grown in small pots or modular trays. It takes about eight weeks for the seedlings to grow into a suitable size for being transplanted into their final growing place. To the inexperienced pepper grower, chillies can seem quite fiddly to grow, so we have come up with twelve simple rules that will help ensure success…

PART ONE chillies

With thousands of varieties, choosing the right ones to grow can be challenging. Getting the right variety, though, doesn’t have to be confusing: it’s simply a matter of deconstructing chillies by considering these essential traits:

Heat level
The heat in chillies is caused by a group of chemicals called capsaicinoids. Their concentration is expressed in Scoville Heat Units (SHU), and the higher the concentration, the hotter the fruit are. Heat levels can range from 700 SHU in mild ones such as Apricot to over a million for the superhots like Dorset Naga, Bhut Jolokia and Trinidad Scorpion. As a rule of thumb, most Brits find heat levels of about 5,000 to 20,000 SHU high enough to suit their needs.
Culininary types
Chillies can be broadly divided into two culinary types. The more familiar of the two are the spice-type chillies which have small, relatively thin-fleshed fruit valued mainly for their heat. They include the cayennes and habaneros that are normally added to a dish in such small quantities that their physical presence goes unnoticed.
In contrast are the vegetable types such as Hungarian Hot Wax and the poblanos that have larger fruit with thicker flesh. They add bulk to a dish, in much the same way as sweet peppers, and tend to be milder.

Plant Growth and Habitat

The natural height and spread of chilli plants varies substantially. This is an important consideration for gardeners with limited space. Some varieties, for example, are short (Prairie Fire and Medusa); others look like shrubs (Hungarian Hot Wax and Early Jalapeño); and still others are tall and gangly (the rocotos and poblanos). Planting in pots rather then in the ground often reduces plant size, while pinching out the growing tips of young plants can make them bushier.

Look out for part 2

Thank you to Sea Spring Seeds!

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If we have encouraged you to grow your own Indian curry recipe ingredients that’s brilliant, or if you have your  own regular garden here are some tips for you.  We’ve had some really sunny days lately perfect for spending extra time out doors!

Do’s & Don’ts!
DO…

  •  Water your veg regularly. The morning or evening is the most effective time as less moisture is lost through evaporation.
  •  Give plants a good deep drench once a day or every two days. This encourages them to send their roots deep into the ground. 
  • Keep harvesting veg like tomatoes, beans and spinach regularly to encourage plants to keep producing more. 
  • Look out for tiny butterfly eggs on the underside of cabbage leaves. Gently rub them off between finger and thumb. 
  • Weed little and often. Use a hoe between your rows of veg, or pull up weeds by hand, before they get a chance to become established.

DON’T…

  • Stop planting new seeds. Get into a routine of sowing a few rows every few weeks so you have a succession of fresh, tender crops.
  • Waste any of your crops – if you have more than you can eat, cook large pots of your favourite dishes and freeze them in handy portion sizes, or invite friends and family round for a feast!
  • Don’t be afraid to experiment – a long, hot summer is the perfect time to try growing more exotic veg like okra or aubergines.
  • Skimp on plant food – a regular application of an organic feed such as liquid seaweed makes all the difference to the health, vigour and flavour of your crops.

Jeannine McAndrew Chaat! magazine

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“INJECT SOME ZEST TO YOUR BBQ WITH SPICE RUBS TO ENHANCE YOUR FOOD TENFOLD!”

www.JustIngredients.co.uk offering 15% discount to our readers code CHAAT15

THERE’S THE SUN! Quick, dust off that barbecue, and get grilling! Us Brits love nothing better than a BBQ in the (rare) sunshine filled days. If, like us, you’ve become bored of the same old burnt beef burgers or cremated somethings-on-a-stick, you’ll be looking for inspiration on how to spice things up a little. Injecting some zest with spice rubs and adding some extra flavourings will enhance
your barbecued food tenfold. Try some of these suggestions and you’ll never go back to plain char-grilled meat again!

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From Spice Bags to making authentic curry simple; the mother of three and Come Dine With Me Contestant, Parveen-the-Spice-Queen is certainly one to watch…

Parveen Ashraf is one exciting, energetic lady with a passion for life, cooking, and sharing her recipes. After setting up Amaani Spice in 2008, she first appeared on our television screens back in 2010 on Channel 4’s Come Dine With Me. The show gave her a first taste of television, and since then people from all around the UK have been trying her blended spice mixes for themselves.

The Amaani Spice Box contains 13 different spices which are blended together in perfect proportions for the recipes. Parveen feels that one of the main spice mixes – her mum’s Garam Masala recipe – are what give her curries their unique flavour.

The spice box contains easy step-by-step recipe cards and all the spices you will need to make 5 different Indian dishes for up to 6 people. Parveen hopes to have de-mystified Indian cooking and simplified it to the extent that anyone with basic cooking skills can use her Amaani Spice Box to create authentic delicious Indian food.

A standard spice box contains Parveen’s unique spice-blends to make;

Chicken Masala

Lamb Bhuna

Tarka Daal

Vegetable Pilau Rice

and

A Bhaji Bag mix, which makes approx 25 onion and potato bhajis

You can also choose your own selection of recipes to include on her website. Amaani Spice Boxes are available at: www.amaanispice.co.uk.

In the meantime, Parveen is now writing her first book, so watch this space!

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Traditional Chinese Remedies for Hay Fever Sufferers

Just when we start to get a little sunshine in Britain and the flowers bloom, many of you like myself will suddenly get an onslaught of sneezing, the need to itch your eyes until you resemble a zombie, and a sluggish sensation in your mind. Not exactly the beach babe look we’d envisaged, huh? Well fear not my hay fever suffering friends! These traditional Chinese remedies for hay fever may just give you the ability to punch pollen in the, err, plant?

Traditional Chinese remedies include the use of herbs, for example the Japanese catnip or the Siler divaricata, which are believed to repel wind. Plant these in your garden and see if your eyes stop being so itchy! Herbs such as Angelica dahurica, magnolia flower buds and Xanthium sibiricum drain dampness, when combined together they create Xanthium Decoction, used to clear the nasal passages and sinuses. Why not try this concoction and see if you remain sneeze-free?

Traditional Chinese remedies believe that diet can help in taming hay fever. It is believed that food such as sweets, dairy products and cold foods have a tendency to cause mucus build-up, and highly recommend avoiding ice cream and yogurt. So for all you sweet-tooth foodies out there, you may have to swap your Magnums for a healthier option! If your digestive system is working well, this will help lessen the chances of mucus build up. Foods that are easy for the body to digest include soups, salads, vegetables and boiled grains.

Another popular Chinese remedy is acupuncture. In fact, acupuncture is known to relieve allergy symptoms immediately when used on certain parts around the nose. However, we do know that having needles stuck in you can be a daunting thought, so be sure to try the herb and diet remedies first if the thought of acupuncture makes you light-headed!

Words by Rebecca Trussell

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What do you get the person who loves curry? The UK’s only magazine for lovers of spice, of course!

Along with your chilli plant (worth £19!), you’ll receive our exciting Summer issue featuring:

  • Part 2 of our ‘How to grow your own curry’ feature – With a large section on growing your own curry ingredients from top experts
  • 27 fantastic recipes ranging from flavoursome nibbles to impressive desserts that will make you feel like a culinary genius in the kitchen.
  • A  spotlight on summery spicy twists on barbecuing season.
  • As always, there’s plenty of inspiration from the UK’s top restaurants and chefs, and travel diaries that will whisk you off to exotic destinations.
  •  Don’t miss our regular column with Bill Oddie and features from Mridula Baljekar, Alan Coxon and Cyrus Todiwala, as well as an interview with Nina Wadia and Anjum Anand.
  • We also need YOU to vote for your favourite curry for the country’s only Top of the Poppadoms poll.

To subscribe and claim your free chilli plant while stocks last go straight to the subscription page now!

http://subscribe.chaatmagazine.co.uk/free-chilli-plant-worth-ps19-with-every-6-issue-chaat-magazine-subscription.html

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This is a beautiful, full-flavoured, creamy dish that hails from the Christians of Kerala. It is known as ishtu, a word that is a derivation of ‘stew’, because this is a naturally-fused dish of east and west. Chicken and vegetables are all cooked together with the local flavours of the south western coast ofIndia. There are lots of spices, but the flavours have been mellowed by coconut. Don’t worry, you can still taste lovely bits of ginger and the flavours of star anise and fennel seeds. You can make this without vegetables, or add whatever vegetables you have in the fridge; it’s that kind of dish. Lovely with rice, Naan or Paratha, or even the rice noodles which are often eaten in Kerala.

 

6 tbsp coconut or vegetable oil

1 tsp mustard seeds

5cm cinnamon stick

6 green cardamom pods

4 cloves

10 black peppercorns

2 star anise

15 curry leaves

1 onion, finely sliced

20g fresh root ginger, peeled weight,

finely chopped

6 garlic cloves, finely chopped

2–4 green chillies, whole but pierced (optional)

½ tsp turmeric

¼–½ tsp chilli powder

1 tbsp ground coriander

2 tsp fennel seeds, roughly powdered

salt, to taste

500g skinless chicken joints

400ml can coconut milk

1 tbsp coconut cream (optional)

¾–1 tsp tamarind paste, or to taste

handful of green beans, topped and

tailed, halved on the diagonal

2 handfuls of green peas, fresh or

frozen and defrosted

small fistful of fresh coriander leaves

 

Heat the oil in a wide pan (a karahi or wok is ideal). Add the whole spices and, once the seeds have stopped popping, the curry leaves. Follow immediately with the onion and cook over a moderate heat until translucent. Add the ginger, garlic and green chillies and sauté gently for one or two minutes, or until the garlic is cooked.

 

Add the turmeric, chilli, ground coriander, fennel seeds and salt with a splash of water and cook for two minutes. Put in the chicken and cook in the spice paste for two minutes more. Pour in water to come one-third of the way up the chicken, bring to a boil, then lower the flame and cook, covered, for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. The liquid in the pot should have reduced quite a bit by now. Add most of the coconut milk (try and add only the thin milk that collects at the bottom of the can at this point), cover and cook for another five minutes. Uncover and cook off most of the excess liquid, giving the pan occasional stirs. Check the chicken is cooked all the way through, with no trace of pink.

 

Stir in the remaining thick coconut milk, coconut cream (if using), tamarind, beans and peas; the dish should be creamy. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Simmer for three to four minutes, then serve with the coriander leaves.

 

serves 4-6

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LAST YEAR, WE spoke to Hairy Bikers Si and Dave about their culinary trip to India. The two have since journeyed to Asia, visiting the glorious sights of Hong Kong, Japan, Thailand and Korea to fulfil their culinary thirst. They haven’t just  found speedy and easy recipes packed with flavour, they’ve uncovered the unusual traditions that go with them. A part of what makes their new cookbook such a great read is the insight into each country’s food customs.

YOU CAN ENTER IN ONE OF THREE WAYS:

EMAIL: Send your details to competition @britishcurryclub.co.uk with “BIKERS’”in the subject line

TWITTER: Re-tweet our competition post and follow us

FACEBOOK: ‘Like’ our page and share our competition post
Please enter by May 31st 2014. Good luck!

 

UK Delivery Only

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