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A quick and easy dish, yet impressive.

You can be really imaginative with flavourings and try whatever is in season to flavour it.

Serves: 4

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Cooking time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

6 large British Lion eggs

1 red onion, finely chopped

2 green chillies, seeded and finely chopped

½ tsp roasted cumin seeds, coarsely crushed

½ tsp turmeric

1 tbsp chives, finely chopped

1 tsp green coriander, finely chopped

1 ½ tsp salt

½ inch piece of ginger, finely chopped

2 tbsp oil

Chaat! Magazine Sponsor Product Suggestion East End Foods Range – Ground Cumin www.store.eastendfoods.co.uk

For the sauce

3 tbsp oil

1 bay leaf

2 green cardamoms

1 large onion, finely chopped

1 tbsp ginger and garlic paste

1 tsp red chilli powder

½ tsp ground cumin

½ tsp ground coriander

½ tsp ground turmeric

1 tsp salt

3 tomatoes, pureed

½ tsp sugar

½ tsp ground garam masala

1tbsp green coriander, chopped

1 tbsp single cream

Juice from ½ lemon

 

 

Method

  1. Break the eggs and whisk together with all the other ingredients except the oil.

 

  1. Take a large shallow non-stick frying pan and heat the oil, pour in just enough egg mixture to make a thin omelette and as it begins to set, remove from pan and roll into a cylinder similar to a Swiss roll. Repeat the procedure to use all of the egg mixture. Cut the omelette rolls in 1.5 cm thick slices and keep warm.

 

  1. Sauce: heat the oil, add green cardamom and bay leaf and let it crackle for 30 seconds or so, add the onions and cook until golden brown. Add the ginger and garlic paste and stir for a minute. Add the red chilli powder, cumin and coriander, turmeric and salt and cook for another minute or so. Add the tomato puree and cook for 6-8 minutes until mixture is reduced by 1/2. Add sugar and garam masala and finish with fresh coriander, single cream and lemon juice. Pour the sauce on a serving dish and arrange the omelette slices over it. Serve as either a main dish or as an accompaniment.

 

Tip: Add finely chopped vegetables like asparagus, olives, spinach or artichokes to the omelette if you liked. You may even be more experimental with the sauce adding curry leaves and coconut milk if you wanted to make it more interesting.

 

Chaat! issue 12 Published

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With Easter upon us we thought egg recipes would be ideal for the holiday nice and quick!

Serves: 2

Cooking time: 9 minutes

Ingredients

Chaat! Magazine Sponsor Product Suggestion by East End Foods = Garam Masala

4 large British Lion eggs, hard-boiled

2-3 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 onion, finely chopped

3-4 cloves garlic, finely chopped

3cm piece ginger, grated

1-2 green chillies, finely chopped

½ tablespoon tomato purée

¼ teaspoon sea salt

3/4 teaspoon turmeric powder

½ teaspoon ground cumin

½ teaspoon ground coriander

3/4 teaspoon garam masala

1 tomato, finely chopped

200ml coconut milk

100g petite pois

2 tablespoons coriander leaves, chopped

Chapattis or rice to serve

Method

  1. Remove the shell from the boiled eggs (Gizzi uses free range), halve & put aside. Blend the oil, onion, garlic, ginger, green chillies and spices together. Heat a wok and add the paste and fry for 3-4 minutes.

 

  1. Add the tomato, coconut cream and peas and simmer for 5 minutes. For the last 2 minutes of cooking add the boiled eggs. Serve the egg curry hot, garnished with coriander leaves, with chapattis or rice.

Chaat magazine issue 12

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This Palestinian sweet, known as knefeh, is a speciality of the city of Nablus in the West Bank, and is made using Nabulsi cheese – a semi-soft white brined cheese that becomes soft and stretchy when heated. You need to soak the Nabulsi overnight to reduce its saltiness. Alternatively you can use mozzarella as a substitute. The cheesecake can be made with semolina (“fine knefe”), shredded filo (“coarse knefe”) or a combination of both (“wavering knefe”).

SERVES 8
PREPARATION TIME: 15 Minutes
COOKING TIME: 1 ½ hours

Chaat! Magazine Sponsor Product Suggestion East End Food Range

www.store.eastendfoods.co.uk

INGREDIENTS

125g/ 4 ½oz caster sugar
1tsp lemon juice
1tsp orange blossom water
125g/ 4 ½oz melted butter, plus extra for greasing
A pinch of ground saffron or turmeric
250f/ 9oz defrosted shredded filo pastry (kataifi)
500g/ 1lb 2oz Nabulsi cheese or mozzarella
500g/ 1lb 2oz mascarpone
½tsp ground malab (optional)
30g/ 1oz pistachios

METHOD

  1. Dissolve the sugar 125ml/4fl oz water in a heavy based saucepan. Add the lemon juice and heat over a medium-high heat until all the sugar has dissolved. Bring to the boil, stirring occasionally, then reduce the heat to low and let it simmer for about 15 minutes until it reaches a syrupy consistency. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the orange blossom water. Set aside to cool.
  2. Put the melted butter and saffron in a bowl and leave to steep for a few minutes, stirring just to incorporate.
  3. Put the shredded pastry into a mixing bowl. Po in the saffron butter and use your fingers to rub the butter all over the pastry strings.
  4. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Shred the Nabulsi into another mixing bowl, add the mascarpone and mahlab, if using, and use your hands to mix it together.
  5. Generously grease a round 23cm/9in cake tin with butter and spread about half of the buttered filo strings across the bottom. Spread the cheese mixture across the pastry layer evenly, then cover by spreading the remaining layer of film strings evenly over the top.
  6. Bake in the oven for 1-1 ¼ hours until the cheese is bubbling and the pastry is golden. A good way to test readiness is to wiggle the pan gently – the cheesecake should come away from the edges.
  7. Finally, place under a hot grill for 1-2 minutes to achieve an evenly golden top layer. Pour the cooled sugar syrup over the top before serving, or serve with syrup on the side if preferred.
  8. Grind the pistachios into a powder using a pestle and mortar, then sprinkle the powder over the cheesecake. Slice into squares and serve.
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Wing Yip’s Beef and Broccoli in Oyster Sauce is a perfect choice for a healthy dinner during a January detox. The broccoli in the dish is super nutrient rich, while protein packed beef is a great source of vitamin B.

Wing Yip is the UK’s largest oriental supermarket chain, bringing authentic Oriental ingredients to British kitchens. From flavoursome Asian sauces and pastes to traditional rice noodles and Oriental teas, Wing Yip is a one-stop shop for authentic Pan-Asian cuisine

Beef and Broccoli in Oyster Sauce

Serves 2

Ingredients:

340g beef steak (sirloin or fillet steak)

2tsp Wing Yip Light Soya Sauce

2tsp sesame oil

1tsp corn flour

284g broccoli (cut into florets and blanched)

Chaat Sponsor Product Suggestion from The East End Foods Range

www.store.eastendfoods.co.uk

2tsp minced ginger (or fresh)

75ml Wing Yip Oyster Sauce

2tbsp peanut oil

Method:

  1. Cut the beef thinly across the grain and season with light soya sauce, sesame oil and a little cornflour.
  2. Clean and blanch the broccoli florets.
  3. Heat the peanut oil in a wok and fry the ginger and broccoli together. Remove from wok and set aside.
  4. Turn up the heat and add the beef in batches to seal the meat.
  5. Add the Oyster sauce and broccoli and stir well. If you prefer your beef pink, now is time to turn off the heat. Alternatively continue cooking for another 2 minutes.

 

Wing Yip has four superstores located in Birmingham, Cricklewood, Croydon and Manchester which stock more than 4,500 authentic Oriental groceries and products. Its online store www.wingyipstore.co.uk

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It’s said that life begins at 40, yet while some men buy the sports car or embark on a change of image, when celebrity chef Tom Kerridge passed that famous age milestone he decided he needed to alter his lifestyle in order to make the most of his middle years.

“I think when people get to 40 a great number end up taking a long look at themselves – they start to think about where they’ve gone, what they’ve done, what they’ve achieved and where they are going in the future,” the owner of Marlow’s two-Michelin-starred gastropub The Hand and Flowers explains. “From a health point of view, I definitely wasn’t in a great place and I needed to change that. So it hadn’t altered where I was, and I don’t think it was having an effect on my life and personality, but health-wise it was something I needed to recognise in myself and change for the better.”

 

What Kerridge decided on was a low-carb diet regime that, three years later, has resulted in over 11st of weight lost. This ‘Dopamine Diet’, as he terms it in his new book, was crafted specially to give readers the chance to get fit while still eating food that not only tastes fantastic but makes you feel great as well.

 

“It’s a personal story; I’ve already been there and done it, so it’s little tips on how I did it myself,” Kerridge says. “It’s the difference between being told not to do it and being shown how not to do it by someone who has already lost 11st and has done it the right way – the way that worked for me, at least. If just one person buys into it then the book has been worth doing, because it means it has helped that one person change their life.”

 

Despite undergoing an impressive physical transformation, Kerridge is adamant that his new focus on low-carb cooking hasn’t changed his relationship with Great British cooking in any way.

 

“It just embraces everything I already do,” he says of the Dopamine Diet. “The things that will help drive flavours of food forward – that is really important to me, so it has helped reinforce everything I already know. It’s very protein-led, so the roasts are still there, the stews are still there, and curries – that sort of spicing of dishes – is all still there.”

 

When it comes to curries, Kerridge is effusive – and the hotter, the better, he enthuses. He explains this is because when we eat spicy chillies our brains are tricked by the heat into releasing endorphins, which results in a natural high. His curry dishes make use of homemade sauces stuffed full of his favourite spices – curry leaves, turmeric, paprika and his secret ingredient, vinegar. “The acidity of the vinegar complements the spice fantastically,” he reveals.

 

And the prevalence of great Indian cooking these days only serves to further fuel Kerridge’s undying passion for the UK’s diverse restaurant industry.

 

“The year after we won the National Restaurant Award, the next winner was a fantastic curry house called Gymkhana,” he says. “It shows how great the culinary scene in this country is now – number one was a pub and then a curry house!”

TRY EAST END FOODS CURRY POWDER WITH THIS RECIPE

RECIPE:

Curried Cauliflower Soup – Serves 4

Ingredients:

50g dried onion flakes

2 tbsp vegetable oil

50g butter

1 onion, diced

2 garlic cloves, grated

1½ tbsp curry powder

1 chicken or vegetable stock cube

1 large cauliflower (about 800g), broken into florets

200ml coconut cream

200g cream cheese

4 tbsp chopped coriander, tender stems and all

2 hot green chillies, sliced, seeds and all

Finely grated zest of 1 lime

Sea salt and cayenne pepper

 

Recipe:

Preheat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/gas 4. Scatter the onion flakes on a baking tray. Trickle on the oil, give it a stir and season with salt. Bake for 5 minutes, or until onion flakes are golden brown, then set aside to cool.

 

In a large saucepan, melt the butter over a medium-low heat. Add the onion and the garlic and sweat gently, stirring from time to time, for around 10-15 minutes until soft. Sprinkle on the curry powder and cook, stirring for 2-3 minutes.

 

Now pour in 1 litre of water and crumble in the stock cube. Bring to the boil and add the cauliflower florets. Turn the heat down to a simmer and cook for 5-10 minutes, until the cauliflower is soft.

 

Stir in the coconut cream and cream cheese until fully combined. Bring back to the boil and then take the pan off the heat.

 

Blitz with a stick blender, or in a jug blender or food processor. If you’ve time, pass the soup through a sieve into a clean pan at this point – this will give the soup an unbelievably silky and delicious texture. Warm gently and season to taste with salt and cayenne pepper.

 

Ladle the soup into warmed bowls and scatter over the toasted onion flakes, coriander and chilli, then sprinkle with the lime zest.

– Serves 4

Ingredients:

50g dried onion flakes

2 tbsp vegetable oil

50g butter

1 onion, diced

2 garlic cloves, grated

1½ tbsp curry powder

1 chicken or vegetable stock cube

1 large cauliflower (about 800g), broken into florets

200ml coconut cream

200g cream cheese

4 tbsp chopped coriander, tender stems and all

2 hot green chillies, sliced, seeds and all

Finely grated zest of 1 lime

Sea salt and cayenne pepper

 

Recipe:

Preheat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/gas 4. Scatter the onion flakes on a baking tray. Trickle on the oil, give it a stir and season with salt. Bake for 5 minutes, or until onion flakes are golden brown, then set aside to cool.

 

In a large saucepan, melt the butter over a medium-low heat. Add the onion and the garlic and sweat gently, stirring from time to time, for around 10-15 minutes until soft. Sprinkle on the curry powder and cook, stirring for 2-3 minutes.

 

Now pour in 1 litre of water and crumble in the stock cube. Bring to the boil and add the cauliflower florets. Turn the heat down to a simmer and cook for 5-10 minutes, until the cauliflower is soft.

 

Stir in the coconut cream and cream cheese until fully combined. Bring back to the boil and then take the pan off the heat.

 

Blitz with a stick blender, or in a jug blender or food processor. If you’ve time, pass the soup through a sieve into a clean pan at this point – this will give the soup an unbelievably silky and delicious texture. Warm gently and season to taste with salt and cayenne pepper.

 

Ladle the soup into warmed bowls and scatter over the toasted onion flakes, coriander and chilli, then sprinkle with the lime zest.

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Feel like something nice and sweet!

In these yummy treats, thinly sliced South African Pink Lady apples are microwaved
and then arranged on folded filo pastry, sprinkled with cinnamon, and rolled up.
They are baked for a few minutes until tender – and they end up looking like roses.
Clever!

TRY EAST END FOODS GROUND CINNAMON IN THIS RECIPE

Preparation: 20 minutes
Cooking: 25 minutes
Serves: 6
A little butter or vegetable oil, for greasing
3 South African Pink Lady apples
2 tbsp lemon juice
6 sheets filo pastry, thawed if frozen
80g butter, melted
6 tbsp apricot jam, warmed
A few pinches of ground cinnamon
Icing sugar, for sprinkling (optional)
1 Preheat the oven to 200°C, fan oven 180°C, Gas Mark 6. Grease 6 holes of a muffin
tin with butter or vegetable oil.
2 Core and thinly slice the apples, putting the slices into a bowl with 300ml justboiled
water with the lemon juice as you do them, so that they don’t brown.
Microwave them on HIGH for 3 minutes to soften. Leave to stand for 5 minutes, then
drain thoroughly.
3 Working on one at a time, brush a sheet of filo pastry with melted butter. Fold it in
half lengthways, then brush the surface with butter and fold in half again
lengthways. Brush with 1 tablespoon of warmed apricot jam. Arrange apple slices
along the top end of each strip with the pink peel uppermost. Sprinkle with a little
cinnamon, then roll up the pastry, so that the apple slices are just enclosed. Scrunch
the pastry base and place in the muffin tin, so that the apples look like roses. Repeat
to make 6 in total.
4 Bake for 20-22 minutes, until the apple slices are browning slightly along their
edges. Cool for a few minutes, then remove from the muffin tins and serve warm,
sprinkled with icing sugar (if using).
Cook’s tip: Make green ‘roses’ with South African Granny Smith or Golden Delicious
apples.

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Born out of a shared love of Sri Lankan cuisine, Sri-Licious is the creation of close friends Mary and Callie. Based in Gloucestershire, we serve up fresh, tasty Sri Lankan food from a converted catering transit van at street food fairs and festivals in the South West and Midlands.

Having grown up in Sri Lanka, the cuisine had been Mary’s favourite food since an early age. When Mary suggested Callie visit the country it quickly became hers too!

You can hear the clanging of blades coming from the Sri-Licious van as homemade roti, fresh vegetables and spices are chopped on the griddle while the popular street food dish Kottu Roti is prepared to order. Vegan at base, there are several different toppings on offer, such as devilled paneer, devilled tofu or pineapple.

 

The pair  serve various Sri Lankan specialities including egg hoppers and ‘short eats’ – Sri Lankan snacks, such as vegetable roti parcels, or Seeni buns, bread rolls stuffed with sweet and spicy onion sambol. We caught up with Mary and Callie to find out a bit more about their Sri-lankan street food. The

 

  • How did the idea of Sri-licious come about? Did you cook lots of Sri-Lankan cuisine at home already, or was it a completely ‘from scratch’ endeavour?

As well as constantly cooking Sri Lankan food at home, we kept traveling to London to get our Sri Lankan food fix as there were no restaurants nearby us! We had also always loved the street food scene, going to markets in Birmingham and Bristol regularly and wanted to get involved!

  • What was the first Sri Lankan dish you fell in love with?

Egg hoppers, they are so different to anything else we have ever tried and you can cater them to your palette with a variety of tasty sambols! are made with a batter of rice flour and coconut milk, cooked in a bowl shaped pan with an egg poached inside, and they then add different sambols and chutneys; from fiery chili and onion to fragrant coconut and lime.

  • Who are your customers?

Our customers are the best! Adventurous foodies who are happy to try something different, or fellow Sri Lanka lovers who have visited the country on holiday and want to reminisce about the island’s culinary delights.

  • For anyone who hasn’t tried Sri-Lankan food before, what would you recommend to try first?

‘Short Eats’ are a great introduction as they sum up the combination of Sri Lankan spices and European influences that make the cuisine so unique, and as they’re only small, you can try lots!

  • What is your favourite dish and why?

It’s so hard to choose just one! It would probably have to be Kottu Roti as we find it is the perfect comfort food!

  • Do you have a nice simple recipe our readers can try at home themselves?

Kottu Roti Recipe (serves 4)

 

This is a simplified version of the Kottu Roti we serve up from our trusty van!

TRY EAST END FOOD GARAM MASALA FOR THIS RECIPE

 

Kottu Roti

Ingredients

8 Rotis

500g carrots

1kg spring greens

3 bell peppers

1 green chili (or more if you like it hot!)

2 tsp garam masala

Thumb sized piece of ginger

1 large white onion

2 tbsp vegetable oil

Sprig of fresh curry leaves (optional)

2 eggs (optional)

Salt to taste

 

Finely chop the onion and set aside. Coarsely chop the roti bread, peppers and spring greens so they are slightly smaller than bite size. Either use a julienne slicer to shred the carrots, or use a grater to grate them. Use a garlic press to crush the garlic, or finely chop it. Finely chop the green chili and ginger.

 

Heat the oil on a griddle, or if you don’t have a griddle you can use a large pan (such as a wok) to a hot heat, this is sort of like a Sri Lankan stir fry so everything will be cooked quickly!

 

Add the chopped onion and let cook for a minute or so, add the garam masala and curry leaves (if using).

 

Add the chopped peppers, spring greens, crushed garlic, ginger, chili and let cook for a few minutes. If at any point it starts sticking, just add a little bit of water.

 

Add the chopped roti and julienned carrots, heat for a few more minutes until the vegetables are all cooked.

 

If using eggs, crack them into a small bowl and whisk, adding to the kottu mixture at the last minute, constantly stirring to make sure it coats the ingredients equally. Continue to stir for a minute or so until the egg is cooked through.

 

Salt to taste and serve up on four plates!

 

  • Finally, where can we find you?!

We pop up all around the South West and Midlands – just keep an eye on our website and social media pages. We’re also available for private events so do get in touch if you would like something deliciously different at your wedding or birthday party!

CHAAT ISSUE 29

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Crab is very fashionable at the moment

This delicious dish is messy because you have to crack the crab claws and eat with your fingers, but it is worth it! The stylish host would provide rosewater fingerbowls for the guests.

Recipe by Keith Floyd one of the legends of the reality cooking programs that both entertained and provided viewers with an insight into regional cooking styles across India.

serves 4

vegetable or coconut oil

1 tablespoon small black mustard seeds 10 –15 fresh curry leaves

100 g/4 oz red onion or red shallots, finely chopped

150 g/5 oz tomatoes, chopped 1 teaspoon ground turmeric   1 tablespoon red chilli powder

25 g/1 oz ginger and garlic purée (see page 56)

500 ml/18 fl oz coconut milk salt

2 or 3 small raw crabs per person, chopped in half, cleaned out, gills and stomach sac removed and the claws cracked

a handful of small fresh curry leaves or fresh mint or coriander leaves, to garnish

 

  • Heat some oil in a pan, add the mustard seeds and curry leaves and cook until the mustard seeds cr

 

  • Stir in the onion or shallots and sauté until soft, then add the chopped tomatoes and cook until you have a rich tomato and onion gravy.

 

  • Stir in the turmeric and chilli powder and cook until the raw flavour disappears. Add a little water to help you do this, if necessary.

 

  • Now stir in the ginger and garlic purée and the coconut milk and simmer gently until you have a nicely amalgamated gravy. Season to taste with salt, then pop in the crabs and cook them gently until the shells have turned r

 

  • If using curry leaves for the garnish, quickly stir-fry them in very hot oil and sprinkle them over the crabs. Alternatively scatter with fresh mint or coriander leaves and serv
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