Archive for May, 2017

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Street food has become so popular over the last decade in the UK, but there are still many regions of street food still to be explored by UK diners, here is recipe from South Africa!

Bunny chow is simply a hollow bread roll stuffed with curry – not made with real bunny, but with tender pieces of stewed lamb. In its native South Africa it is often spooned into large hollowed-out loaves of bread, which are designed to be eaten with your hands – quite a challenge, even for the most dextrous! For ease of eating I prefer to use smaller rolls, so really hungry diners may want more than one.

Order your copy of Chaat! to get more recipes like this 

SERVES 4–8, ALLOWING 1–2 EACH, DEPENDING ON GREED

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

700g lamb leg steaks, cut into 3cm cubes

2 onions, roughly chopped

3 garlic cloves, chopped

4cm piece fresh root ginger, chopped

1 tablespoon cumin seeds

2 teaspoons fennel seeds

1–2 teaspoons dried chilli flakes, to taste

1 cinnamon stick

4 vine tomatoes, chopped

2 tablespoons garam masala

550–600g (around 2 large)

potatoes, peeled and cut into 3cm cubes

8 large crusty white bread rolls

salt and freshly ground black pepper

a small bunch of coriander, chopped, to garnish

1 small red onion, thinly sliced, to garnish

Spices for the recipe go to store.eastendfoods.co.uk/

Place the vegetable oil in a large, heavy-based pan and set over a high heat. When it’s hot, brown the lamb in 2 or 3 batches, transferring to a plate as you go. Set aside.

Add the onion, garlic and ginger to a food processor and whizz to a smooth paste, adding a tablespoon or two of cold water to help it along, if necessary.

Lower the heat on the empty pan and add the cumin, fennel, chilli flakes and cinnamon stick, frying for a few seconds until you can smell their aroma wafting up from the pan. Stir through the onion paste and fry for 10 minutes until starting to soften. Return all the meat and any juices to the pan, along with the tomatoes and garam masala. Season with salt and pepper, pour in 500ml water and bring to the boil. Cover with a lid, reduce the heat to low and simmer gently for about an hour, until the meat is nearly tender. Add the potatoes, re-cover and simmer for another 30 minutes or so until the potatoes are cooked.

While the curry is simmering, slice the tops off the bread rolls and scoop out the insides to leave a shell about 1cm thick all round. Reserve the insides for dunking in the curry.

When the curry has finished cooking, divide evenly between the hollow rolls. Garnish with a little coriander and a few onion slices and eat immediately – cutlery optional!

Credit: MasterChef: Street Food of the World by Genevieve Taylor with recipes from previous MasterChef winners worldwide (Absolute Press, £26)

Photography © David Loftus

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Anjula’s World of Daal! More recipes like this in issue 28 of Chaat! 

Daal’s the store cupboard ingredients that can trigger your taste buds and culinary skills!

Anjula’s tells Chaat!, “I have always loved daal; for me it’s the ultimate delicious comfort food. I’m not quite sure why many people in the UK don’t appreciate the myriad benefits of lentils and pulses. Not only are these beautiful gems full of nutritional value, they are affordable, sustainable and healthy. Chana daal, for example, is incredibly low in GI and is great for diabetics”.

If you search online for ‘black-eyed peas,’ you’ll find lots of results for the famous American hip-hop band as well as for these wonderful beans – that’s right, they are actually beans rather than peas. Known as ‘lobia’ in Hindi and Punjabi, black-eyed peas combined with coconut milk make this dish a real delight. You can use dry black-eyed peas, but do remember to soak them overnight. They are delicious eaten hot or cold and come with some impressive nutritional benefits.

Serves 4

Ingredients

Key Spices

1 Indian bay leaf

1 1 inch piece of cassia bark

1 tsp turmeric powder

1 tsp red chilli flakes

1 tsp crushed coriander seeds

1 tsp cumin seeds

Warming Spices

1 tsp fennel seeds

2 cloves

4 green cardamom, lightly bashed

Other Spices

1/2 tsp ajwain seeds

Wet Ingredients

2 tbs vegetable oil

2 onions, finely chopped

3 fresh tomatoes, chopped

2-3 green chillies, pierced

1 tsp fresh pulped ginger

2 tsp fresh pulped garlic

2 400 g tins of black-eyed peas, rinsed and drained

200 ml coconut milk

2 tbs tamarind paste

Sea salt to taste

1tsp grated jaggery

Garnish

Small bunch of fresh coriander, chopped

Method 

Heat a sauté pan, with a lid, on a medium heat and warm the vegetable oil. Add the onions and sauté for 3 minutes.

Add the Indian bay leaf, cassia bark and salt to taste. Continue to sauté for 5 minutes, then add the turmeric powder, red chilli flakes, tomatoes and jaggery. Stir well and continue to sauté gently on a low heat for 10 minutes.

Add the green chillies, garlic and ginger and sauté for 2 minutes.

Place a small pan on a low heat and gently warm the crushed coriander seeds, cumin seeds and ajwain seeds for 1 minute. Remove from the heat and add to the onions and tomatoes.

In the same small pan, warm the warming spices on a low heat for 1 minute. Set aside.

Add the black-eyed peas, stir really well and cook for 3 minutes.

Add the coconut milk, bring to the boil and immediately reduce to a simmer.

Add the warming spices and tamarind paste, then place the lid on the pan and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat, add the chopped coriander and serve with basmati rice.

Recipe by Anjula Devi

NB – remember to count the cloves and cardamoms in and then count them out again before serving.

 

Piercing your fresh chillies with a cocktail stick gives you more control over the warmth of your dish. If you like your dish hot, then simply chop the chillies rather than pierce them. 

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Issue 28 is available now at WHSmith stores nationwide for all you budding spice lovers!! With 23 hot recipes for you to exercise your culinary skills! Chaat! Magazine is a delightful read for those who love a bit of world flavour! Even our team here have a real addition to spicy cuisine and it’s such a desire that we find it quite difficult to control! To name a few Pakistani, Indonesian, Bengali, Chinese, Thai, Sri Lankan and Indian recipes is a real way of enjoying the Asian Culture!

A big thank you to East End Foods for their support of Chaat! for all your spice needs visit store.eastendfoods.co.uk plus thanks to Kingfisher Beer who have held strong and their love of spicy cuisine is untouchable! 

Anjula Devi a budding fan of Chaat! plus a real wealth amongst up and coming evangelists of spicy cuisine shares her love of daal’s with recipes to use up your store cupboard ingredients! Our grow your own curry campaign continues with support from Sutton Seeds, plus our schools campaign this year we have been joined by celebrity chefs, Cyrus Todiwala, Anjum Anand and Hari Ghotra.

We have a gone a cross the way to pay a visit to the delightful cuisine of Pakistani with Shezhad Hussain! Street food is still very much on the table and enjoyed by so many people here in the UK now but we are cooking MasterChef style!!

Tom Kerridge speaks to us on how he still enjoyed the love of spicy cuisine and regained his slim and slender figure!

Plus lots more!!

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