Archive for April, 2017

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RE: GROW YOUR OWN CURRY
Welcome to the this years British Curry Club’s campaign to
encourage the public to “grow your own curry” ingredients!

This is the second year we invite primary schools to get involved in our “Grow Your Own Curry” campaign, along with help from our campaign partners, Chaat! Magazine, Sutton Seeds, East End Spices and Sweet Cherry Publishers. We also have celebrity chefs providing recipes for both schools and parents to cook up!

There can be nothing better than encouraging young people to enjoy gardening, and being able to use these fresh ingredients to cook their very own curry, either in school or at home! Global foods topic is encouraged by the primary schools educational curriculum.

Your school may already have a gardening patch or have some spare pots ready to grow your seeds in!

For your school to get involved it is very simple, all you have to do is:
b Use as many of the Sutton Seeds we have included with this letter
b Put the poster up in your school to spread the message of the campaign
b If your school has a Website, Facebook or Twitter post #Growyourowncurry
Plus if you would like to get involved in our nationwide competition with the chance of being one of three schools to win £200 and for one pupil to win £25 worth of of reading books provided by Sweet Cherry Publishing then register your involvement by returning the slip or email to [email protected] by the 30 June 2017, then by the 15 July send us letters/drawings from your pupils telling us about your schools vegetable path and how much they have enjoyed taking part in the schools gardening club.

Terms and conditions

  • Completed competition entry form must be returned by post or email
  • ([email protected]ritishcurryclub.co.uk) by the 30 JUNE 2017.
  • All competition entrant schools must publically display #Growyourowncurry either on the schools website, Facebook or Twitter
  • School can use Sutton Seeds or other seeds the school may already be using for the schools gardening club/activities.
  • All schools sending in letters must make sure there is a clear covering letter stating the schools contact details and each letter is marked on the back with pupils name and class for traceability and letters to arrive by 15 July 2017, to the competition address below.
  • 3 winning schools will be chosen by the merit of pupil’s letters emphasizing the enjoyment of their schools gardening club; to receive £200 worth of books from Sweet Cherry Publishing.
  • No cash alternative will be offered in exchange for books. No alternative prize will be offered.
  • Books will be delivered to the UK school address on the entrant form, date of delivery to be confirmed.
  • One winning pupils from each winning school will be awarded a voucher for £25 where Sweet Cherry Publishing will deliver to the pupil via the school  contact details, and gardening club organiser, books to the value of £25 from the publishers range for the age group.
  • The decision of the British Curry Club and the campaign partners are final.
  • Competition in partnership with all campaign partners.
  • Entrants must be primary schools from the UK.
  • Entrant forms and posters can be requested by contacting [email protected]
  • All schools sending in letters from pupils must be primary age pupil and be UK residents.
  • For details of the prize winner, please contact the competition owner [[email protected] or British Curry Club 6 Bute Crescent, Cardiff, CF10 5AN]

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Further recipes and interview in Chaat! issue 28

NEHARI

LAMB NEHARI

Regarded as the national dish of Pakistan, nehari is known for its piquancy

and texture. The name has its origins in Arabic and means ‘day’ or ‘morning’

and it was typically served to kings and nobility around sunrise, after the

Muslim early morning Fajr prayer. The Mughals brought it to the Indian

subcontinent and it soon became a nationwide tradition among the Muslims.

The dish comprises slow-cooked large, tender shanks or pieces of beef,

mutton or lamb and, while not completely authentic, even chicken. Known

for its spiciness, it is a delicious curry with a thick, flavoursome sauce that is

often sold with naan fresh from the tandoor in specialist restaurants and

roadside cafes early in the morning, particularly on weekends.

 

SERVES 4

2 medium onions, peeled and halved

120ml/4fl oz/1⁄2 cup vegetable oil

2 bay leaves

900g/2lb leg of lamb on the bone, cut into 7.5–10cm/3–4in cubes, or 3–4 medium lamb shanks

15ml/1 tbsp garam masala

15ml/1 tbsp ground coriander

10ml/2 tsp garlic pulp

10ml/2 tsp ginger pulp

5ml/1 tsp freshly grated nutmeg

10ml/2 tsp ground fennel seeds

10ml/2 tsp paprika

30ml/2 tbsp tomato paste

7.5ml/11⁄2 tsp salt

1 litre/13⁄4 pints/4 cups water, plus 60ml/4 tbsp to make a flour paste

30ml/2 tbsp plain (all-purpose) flour

15ml/1 tbsp chopped fresh coriander (cilantro)

2 lemons, cut into wedges, to serve

naan or parathas, to serve

TO GARNISH

4–6 fresh green chillies, chopped

45ml/3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander (cilantro)

45ml/3 tbsp peeled and finely sliced fresh root ginger

 

1 Process the onions in a food processor to form a pulp.

2 Heat 60ml/4 tbsp of the oil in a very large pan over a medium heat and fry the

bay leaves for about 30 seconds. Add the meat, followed by the garam masala.

Fry for about 5 minutes, to seal the meat.

3 Add the ground coriander, garlic, ginger, nutmeg, ground fennel seeds,

paprika and tomato paste and stir to combine. Add the salt and stir once more,

then remove from the heat.

4 In a separate pan, heat the remaining oil over a medium heat, add the pulped

onion and fry for about 10 minutes, until golden brown.

5 Add the onion pulp to the lamb and combine everything together. Pour in the

water, return to the heat and bring to the boil.

6 Reduce the heat to low and cook for 45–60 minutes, checking occasionally and

stirring. The curry is ready once the liquid has reduced by at least half and the

meat is tender and falling off the bone.

7 Dissolve the flour in the 60ml/4 tbsp water, whisking it well to make a smooth

paste. Pour this over the lamb while slowly and gently stirring the curry. Cook for

a further 7–10 minutes, stirring frequently, until the sauce is thick.

8 Using a ladle, transfer the curry to a serving dish, or individual deep plates if

using shanks – allowing one per person. Serve garnished with chillies, fresh

coriander, and ginger, and accompany with lemon wedges, and naan or parathas.

The Food and Cooking of Pakistan: Traditional Dishes From The Home Kitchen by Shehzad Husain (HB, Lorenz Books, Dec-16, £14.99) is available now on Amazon.co.uk

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This rich and flavoursome veggie stew is a great way to experiment with your rice cooker, demonstrating that this must-have kitchen gadget can do more than serve up bowls of fluffy basmati. Autumnal veg and piquant spices create a wonderful, and surprisingly light, stew full of delicious flavours and delightful textures.

Vegetarian and vegan friendly, the slow cooked cumin and coriander spiced vegetables with pearl barley proves that hearty dishes needn’t rely on a meaty base.

Quick and easy to make, and a hit with the whole family; this recipe is great for a midweek meal. Using a lot of kitchen essentials and spice rack mainstays, the recipe won’t add a great deal of burden on your weekly shopping list. Plus, if you’ve got young children, this is a great way of getting them to eat a number of veggies they’re usually reluctant to sample.

We’d recommend serving this dish with fresh, crusty bread on the side – great for dipping, scooping and wiping – making sure you don’t miss any of the wonderful spice. Serve direct from the rice cooker, when the vegetables and pearl barley are piping hot.

Here is the recipe for slow cooked cumin and coriander spiced vegetables with pearl barley.

Cook Time: 30 Minutes

Servings: 4-6 People

Ingredients:

  • 1 small squash (peeled, cut into chunks)
  • 2 cups fine beans (topped, tailed and halved)
  • 2 courgettes (sliced)
  • 2 leeks (sliced)
  • 5 carrots (peeled and sliced)
  • 1 medium red onion (sliced)
  • 600g chopped tomatoes
  • 80g pearl barley
  • 1tsp cumin seeds
  • 1tsp coriander seeds
  • 1tsp dried chilli flakes
  • 3 cups vegetable stock
  • 2tbsp vegetable oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Crusty bread (to serve)

Method:

 Using your rice cooker, sauté the carrots, courgettes, squash and red onion in the vegetable oil.

  1. After a couple of minutes, add the chopped tomatoes, pearl barley, spices and vegetable stock.
  2. Switch to cook mode and cover, cooking for 15 minutes.
  3. Stir in the leeks and beans, cover again and cook for a further 10 minutes.
  4. Serve with the fresh, crusty bread.

Original recipe from: www.crockpot.co.uk

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